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Dr. Schubiner TMS and stuttering

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by riv44, Sep 11, 2015.

  1. riv44

    riv44 Well known member




    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Please tell me if late-onset (after age 50) stammering is a possible TMS manifestation. My TMS pain increases usually between 3-5 P.M. I have always been fluent and talkative but in the past year I have trouble getting "s" words out. This mostly happens later in the day, and when I am seeing clients. It is generally when I am experiencing the most anxiety during the day. I doubt very much that I have had a stroke and feel it is psychogenic, given everything else my body does to fool me. I have a feeling neurological testing will be another endless road, like the MRIs for my spine...

    My brother stuttered in early childhood, and even now has unclear speech. I am aware of being anxious for a good part of the day.

    If you are unfamiliar with stammering as a TMS person who is already diagnosed as having mind-body syndrome, I should probably ask for some tests to be performed.

    Although I would rather be in Philadelphia!
     
  2. Alan Gordon LCSW

    Alan Gordon LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    I forwarded your question along to TMS physician Howard Schbuiner, and this was his response:

    If you've seen The King's Speech, you will understand that stuttering (or stammering to the British) is definitely TMS.So, of course, it can occur as a manifestation of TMS at any age.It seems obvious that this is TMS from the description of it occurring during times of stress!I hope this helps.
    Best, Howard


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

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  3. Scott.Cameron

    Scott.Cameron Peer Supporter

    Wow, yet another manifestation of TMS . What I observed many years ago was that stuttering can definitely be contagious! This actually happened to me after I was introduced to somebody who stuttered slightly through a mutual friend. Both myself and mutual friend started to stutter frequently especially when talking to eachother! I knew it had come from socialising with the guy, definitely psychological IMO!

    Mine passed and I'm sure yours can too if you convince yourself it doesn't need to happen!

    Good luck!
     
    IrishSceptic likes this.
  4. IrishSceptic

    IrishSceptic Podcast Visionary

    I received speech therapy when I was quite young and have found on occasion when talking with friends getting the initial word out is difficult. Once I get into the flow its fine.
     
  5. Sarah79

    Sarah79 Peer Supporter

    I'm going back through some of the posts in here, and I stammer. I was reading something by Steve O (I think), and I must paraphrase his energetic, playful writing but I remember a line which basically said, 'when you're not aware of your obsession with your pain, it goes away.' The parallel with stammering (I'm a Brit...), is that when I'm not aware of speaking - ie, I'm in the flow - I don't stammer, either. There are plenty of neurological studies which purport to show 'why' stammering happens, but no-one really knows, so exploring the mind-body connection with this issue is probably a highly therapeutic approach.
     

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