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Difficulty accepting the diagnosis

Discussion in 'Alan Gordon TMS Recovery Program' started by tellmestories, Mar 2, 2017.

  1. tellmestories

    tellmestories New Member

    I've already got a lot of help, mainly from plum, in another subforum, but I feel a bit confused due to the amount of information, and I also feel like I was trying to do the second step before the first, so I decided to do the Recovery Program and the SEP.

    Although I already know that it's no use to think about indiviual symptoms, I'm compiling the evidence sheet now. I feel like this isn't gonna work for me as it should. I'm supposed to accept the diagnosis because there are exceptions from my usual symptom pattern, where I don't have symptoms, which wouldn't be possible if there was a structural damage. But I don't really believe the latter. For example, one might have a broken foot (undoubtedly a structural damage) and be in pain when walking, but on a certain occasion be able to dance around (a little exagerated) due to extreme happiness, or to run away due to great fear. So the pain is gone temporarily. I know it's due to certain hormones, but it shows that you can have exceptions from pain in spite of structural damage.

    Another doubt: Often I read that people know it's TMS because their pain goes away after having walked for a while, when it was present at first. But there is a counterexample for that too, i.e. sore muscles or a bruise can hurt a lot at first, but after some minutes of running the pain goes away, coming back again a couple of minutes after stopping running.

    So there's some doubt here. Any thoughts on that?
     
  2. JanAtheCPA

    JanAtheCPA Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hmm, no responses, tms (haha, great initials there). Just reading your post is making my head spin - I really wouldn't know where to start on any specifics.

    So to be incredibly general: could it be you are overthinking this? Just a little? (is it possible I'm being just a little sarcastic?)

    Look, it's really not that hard to spell out what you need to do to accept the TMS diagnosis and get on with your life: All you have to do is change your way of thinking. 180 degrees. That's it.

    This is also the hardest thing to accomplish, for some people. For others it strangely doesn't seem to be that hard - I believe that these are the "book cure" folks. They actually really get it, right from the start, possibly because they are already thinking in a different direction - for them, Dr. Sarno just provides the final piece of the puzzle.

    So you need to clear your mind, and start over. A couple of things to consider:

    1. The whole concept of the mind-body connection means that our minds have a LOT more control over our bodies than we are taught. This is why people lie on beds of nails and walk over hot coals - to prove this concept. You need to accept it as true. This is a major mind shift.

    2. Our primitive brains are wired to be negative, and to always be on the lookout for danger. The purpose of the primitive TMS mechanism is to keep you on your toes, worried about something tangible (pain), and able to scan the horizon, rather than being mired in emotional turmoil (because TMS is repressing the emotional stuff). You have to learn to recognize this mindset, and change it. This is another major mind shift.

    3. Your brain is constantly talking to you, warning you of danger, worrying you with the "what ifs". You have to learn to hear this chatter, make a conscious decision that it is false, and replace it with something that is true, and is also either constructive or positive. This is the third major mind-shift, and doing it has to become second nature over time.

    Do the programs, keep us posted, and Good Luck!

    ~Jan
     
    tellmestories and Ellen like this.
  3. tellmestories

    tellmestories New Member

    Hi Ellen, thank you for your reply! And sorry for making your head spin. Reading my post again does about the same thing to me. I think I didn't write too well which happens sometimes as English is not my mother tongue. ;)

    Your advice definitely helps me! I guess it's my perfectionist trait that makes me want to rule out every single exception or doubt I have. I'll just have to try to put into action what you recommend me. It looks really reasonable to my yet unexperienced mind in terms of TMS.

    Thank you again for your support, and btw congratulations for your succesful story!
     

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