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Alex B. TMS's strategy

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Guest, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Why does TMS always seem to go the place in my body I'm most worried that I might have hurt or injured?
     
  2. Alex Bloom LCSW

    Alex Bloom LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    This is a good question and very common experience. As I see it there are two main reasons why this phenomenon is so common. The first reason is that this is where the pain is the most effective! Remember, the "purpose" behind the pain is to keep you anxious, preoccupied and distracted. The pain is therefore going to be most effective at accomplishing those tasks by attacking the places in your body where you are most vulnerable. This is closely tied to the phenomenon of TMS pain manifesting in a place where there was previously an actual structural injury that has since healed. You are already anxious and nervous about that spot, say for example your ankle. You're aware of it's vulnerability, you take steps to protect it, you don't run, etc. You're already preoccupied before the TMS pain. The pain simply builds on the anxiety that is already present. It's basically taking the path of least resistance towards making you anxious.

    The second reason is something that some people refer to as "priming". By expecting the pain to be in a certain place, you are actually opening the door for it to manifest. Because you expect it, it is that much less surprising when it comes and you are then less likely to question it. Again, this makes pain in these areas all the more effective at keeping you preoccupied and distracted. If the pain were to manifest itself in a place that you had never experienced discomfort, it would be much easier to dismiss it as an aberration. You could quickly mark it up to a "tweak" or a bad step and then forget about it. Not very "effective". But if it manifests in a place you are already nervous about? Jackpot. You'll be totally consumed by fear and apprehension.

    One of the hardest parts of overcoming TMS is accepting the diagnosis and the fact that your pain is not a structural problem. This is all the more true when it is located in a place where it "makes sense" for you to be in pain. But there is a logic to this and it is important to keep in mind as you remind yourself that you don't in fact have to be afraid.

    Thanks for the great question.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 2, 2014
    Durga, Ellen and Forest like this.
  3. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Alex, you give great advice. Don't let the pain be the big thing in one's life.
    I like to distract myself with pleasant thoughts and experiences.
     
  4. brucedot1

    brucedot1 Newcomer

    Alex, I'm a new "raw" member but what I read is making sense.
     
  5. North Star

    North Star Beloved Grand Eagle

    Guest- Just to throw in my .02 worth. (Which might be inflating the value, some may contend!) Why does TMS favor old injuries? Because the medical establishment supports such "medical mythology" as Dr. Sarno calls it. Our bodies are made to heal.

    In my case, the debilitating headaches and shoulder pain that have afflicted me for years where attributed to a car accident I had over 30 years ago. "Micro tears" one physical therapist told me. "They come back to haunt you as you age," he said.

    I could go on and on about other gloomy predictions given to me by highly educated and very smart people. Because of an accident 30 years ago.

    It's only been the past year that I see the ridiculousness. Instead, things have been turned inside out and upside down where now people think you're nuts if you DON'T blame that ankle pain on a sprain from 3 years ago. We sheeple have been well trained. Baaaaaaaa!

    And btw - welcomea We're glad you're here!
     

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