1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice

Daniel L. Tinnitus, tms, and hearing loss

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Luigi, Mar 10, 2017.

  1. Luigi

    Luigi Newcomer

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I have tinnitus caused by high frequency hearing loss. I am told that my brain is trying to fill in the missing signals with sound. There is not much treatment available. It is a complex nureological disorder. Might this be caused by tms. Not everyone with hearing loss gets tinnitus and they don't know why that is.
    Louis
     
  2. Daniel G Lyman LCSW

    Daniel G Lyman LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    I know I say this a lot, but I’ll say it again: this is a good question. My short answer is: yes, this might be TMS.

    For a more in-depth answer, however, I want to talk a bit about the origins of pain management versus the TMS approach to treating pain/chronic conditions (which is the direction that all pain management is going).

    In traditional pain management, accommodations are often made to help lessen and ease the experience of pain. For example, traditional pain management can often times encourage the use of cushions to accommodate certain back pains, specific shoes for foot pain, or medications to ease various discomforts.

    These are all fine options, but from a neuroscience perspective, you’re only habituating your brain to pay a lot of attention to your discomfort. For example, if I use a cushion to help ease my back pain, in the short term it will help my back feel better, but in the long term it will train my brain to not only be very cautious and careful when I don’t have my cushion with me, but also be more fearful for my back than it otherwise would be. On the contrary, if we wean ourselves off of the cushion, our brain will not focus quite as much on our back and we will eventually learn that we don’t need to be quite as cautious and careful.

    At that point, your brain stops caring so much about what is going on. We learn to not care about the pain as much, and then the pain goes away. TMS achievement unlocked. J

    Now, for pain/discomfort issues that are not necessarily TMS (Tinnitus, in your case - though Tinnitus is often TMS), practitioners used to think that a more traditional pain management approach would be helpful, but quite honestly that’s just not true. Training your brain to not care as much about the ringing in your ears is hugely important.

    I’ve worked with many patients with Tinnitus, and most have seen great reductions in intensity, and many have seen it eliminated. An important key with all of them was to learn how to not react to the symptoms. This was true with even the patients who weren’t positive of whether or not their tinnitus was TMS.

    So, regardless of whether your tinnitus is because of a neurological disorder or TMS (and it sounds like TMS to me), I want you to work with your brain and learn to care just a little bit less about it.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
    Everly likes this.
  3. Steve Ozanich

    Steve Ozanich TMS Consultant

    Once again, a very cogent and wise explanation from Daniel. I can't wait to read his book one day,
     
  4. RachaelM55

    RachaelM55 New Member

    This is the best answer I've seen so far addressed to tinnitus issues, thank you. Dr Sarno's "Mind Over Back Pain" released me from upper back pain of 20 years' duration (1966-1986), but tinnitus has been stubborn. That's why I committed to the 21-day program by Alan Gordon.
     
  5. Ferndale37

    Ferndale37 Peer Supporter

    I agree completely with Daniels answer and have personally habituated to tinnitus when I lost fear of the symptom. I rarely hear it now. The best website that helped me do this was http://tinnitus.org (Tinnitus.org | homepage)

    Amazing resource.
     

Share This Page