1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Our TMS drop-in chat is tomorrow (Saturday) from 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern (now US Daylight Time) . It's a great way to get quick and interactive peer support, with JanAtheCPA as your host. Look for the red Chat flag on top of the menu bar!

Self-Forgiveness and How to Start

Discussion in 'Mindbody Blogs (was Practitioner's Corner)' started by Danielle Szasz LMFT, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. Danielle Szasz LMFT

    Danielle Szasz LMFT TMS Therapist

    Being unable to forgive ourselves for mistakes plays a huge role in TMS symptoms. I have seen clients who still repeatedly beat themselves up for mistakes they made as teens or even as children and who often blame themselves for their pain. This is absolutely brutal on the nervous system and creates a constant state of fight or flight. Here's a little video I made on self-forgiveness and how you can begin to practice it (and it is a learned skill, not just something you should already know how to do!).

     
    Ewok and MWsunin12 like this.
  2. Duggit

    Duggit Well known member

    It seems to me that self-attack (this post) and perfectionism (your June 27 post) are two sides of the same coin. I wonder if you have seen the following by Jon Frederickson: http://istdpinstitute.com/2013/perfectionism/
    I don't know whether you are into insight psychology at all, but it was helpful to me in regulating my lifelong habitual self-attack and perfectionism to understand its genesis.
     
  3. MWsunin12

    MWsunin12 Beloved Grand Eagle

    So strange how the experiences we regret can be felt so profoundly, again. But, even our society and media is built on humiliation, pain, or mistakes. For example: people watch reality shows to see others fail or fight or fall from grace. It's no wonder we replay our own mistakes.

    What do you think about practicing the opposite. Like remembering a time of feeling great or success or even peace. I'm working with this but my attention still wants to look at the negative. It is really a habit of sabotage, isn't it?
     
  4. Danielle Szasz LMFT

    Danielle Szasz LMFT TMS Therapist

    I think you are exactly right. Perfectionism really comes down to how we relate to ourselves when we have failed or made a mistake. I love the link you shared because I think it can bring so much self-compassion to the situation to realize that it's not really us that is refusing to give ourselves the grace of being a human, it's different introjects. It helps so much to see those parts of ourselves for what they are -- parts that are scared and want to keep us connected to our loved ones and that ultimately are no longer adaptive.
     
  5. Danielle Szasz LMFT

    Danielle Szasz LMFT TMS Therapist

    You are so right. There is some part of us that really loves to see people fail and reality tv/social media definitely seems to feed that. I love your idea of imagining the opposite and think it's so helpful in building resilience. As you notice, our brains are so hard-wired to want to replay the negative over and over and it takes a lot of practice and mindfulness to counterbalance that and also draw our attention to the good. Also, as you said, it's a matter of habit and neural pathways and I hope you are able to meet yourself with a lot of self-compassion and patience as you slowly re-wire your brain to also pay attention to feelings of peace or times you felt great.
     
    MWsunin12 likes this.

Share This Page