1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Our TMS drop-in chat is tomorrow (Saturday) from 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern (now US Daylight Time) . It's a great way to get quick and interactive peer support, with JanAtheCPA as your host. Look for the red Chat flag on top of the menu bar!

Derek S. Positive emotions and conditioned responses

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Guest, Feb 18, 2017.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Thank you for creating this site and for answering questions. I have two questions.

    1. Can pain result from repressing positive emotions such as happiness and joy? Or is it only negative ones that do us in?

    2. I have tension headaches every day. But I do have relief when I get up in the morning or when I've been sitting for a while. As soon as I start moving around, the pain starts in. Why?

    Ginnie
     
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for your question, Ginnie.

    I believe that good emotional hygiene entails allowing yourself to feel all of your feelings. This certainly applies to joy/happiness as well as rage and sadness. I view pain as a response to a perceived threat. For many people, feeling anger or sadness can be interpreted by the brain as a threat , thereby resulting in pain. Based on an individual's life experience, it is certainly plausible that the brain could perceive happiness as a threat as well, similarly resulting in pain. Make room for all of your feelings and practice feeling the entire emotional spectrum.

    Regarding your headaches, I would agree that this sounds like a conditioned or associative response. Your brain has learned to associate moving around with pain. The "why" of this matters less than your response to it. Your brain now interprets movement as a "threat" so your job is to neutralize this threat by tending to your anxiety, practicing outcome independence, and responding to the symptom with confidence and assertiveness.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
    mike2014 and Mermaid like this.
  3. Andy Bayliss

    Andy Bayliss TMS Coach & Beloved Grand Eagle

    This is a nice way to summarize things!
     
    Derek Sapico MFT likes this.

Share This Page