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Derek S. MIgrating pain

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Stephenh, Oct 12, 2015.

  1. Stephenh

    Stephenh New Member




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    Question
    Since totally embracing the TMS way for my back pain i have started getting migraines which previously was very rare. Can someone please share some light on the situation (am i thinking about TMS too much?). Also my pain is moving daily around my back which i believe is a good sign

    Stephen
     
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Hi Stephen,

    When symptoms start to migrate and change the way that you describe, it can definitely be a sign of progress. This happens often when you are successfully challenging the validity of a symptom and don't fear it anymore. Your brain will find other symptoms to serve as vessels for fear and preoccupation.

    Migraine headaches are not always TMS so make sure you get checked out for any significant structural or genetic issues.

    Assuming that significant structural causes have been ruled out, approach the migrating pain like you would any TMS symptom. Do not allow it to become something that keeps you in a state of fear, preoccupation or disempowerment. Practice creating safety for yourself and work towards outcome independence.

    It sounds like you are still fairly early in your recovery but what is happening with your symptoms clearly signifies a shift. Use this information as evidence to empower you in your new approach to mind-body symptoms.

    Best of luck.

    -Derek


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
  3. Stephenh

    Stephenh New Member

    Thanks Derek do you have any tips to ignoring the pain symptoms as this seems the hardest part of the recovery?

    Stephen
     
  4. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Steve Ozanich has some of the best advice on ignoring the pain in his book THE GREAT PAIN DECEPTION.
    He was in bad pain all over but resumed playing golf and that, together with believing in TMS and discovering he had big-time repressed anger
    eventually healed him. It wasn't easy for him but he was patient and persevered and won the battle. His anger came from a doctor who botched
    an operation on his wife.

    When pain moves around, it does indicate it is from TMS, as Derek says. Our subconscious wants to give us pain in one place or another so we work on the emotional causes of it.

    Try not to spend more than an hour a day on thinking about TMS. Too much can be counter-productive. Spend more time finding ways to enjoy your days and nights.

    There are some good videos on Youtube on how to treat migraine headaches with natural methods including acupressure.

    Think positive. Your pain is not going to last forever. You are going to get beyond it and be healthier and happier than you ever imagined.
     
    IrishSceptic and Grateful17 like this.
  5. Stephenh

    Stephenh New Member

    Thanks Walt that's great advice
     

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