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Could sudden pain at musculotendon junction be TMS?

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by music321, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    I have TMS, and I accept this. I have classic "fibromyalgia" with chest pains, brain fog, etc. My question is whether a specific problem I seem to encounter is TMS or not. I'll occasionally feel pain at the junction between the muscle and tendon in various muscles as a result of lifting "too much". I am very weak and deconditioned from years of TMS and don't know if these are legitimate injuries or not.

    This evening, for instance, I turned a handle on a garage door. It was difficult to move. It took a bit of effort. As I was doing this, I felt discomfort at the musculotendon junction. The movement was so fast, that I didn't really have time to stop it. It was over in a second. Minutes after, pain developed at the site. Now, several hours later, there is a great deal of pain at the location of the discomfort.

    This happened with my calf muscle 6 weeks ago, and it's only starting to feel better now. I hope that I didn't tear my forearm.

    I know that injury/TMS is not an either/or scenario. People with TMS still suffer real injury. I'm wondering if anyone has had something like this happen, and discovered it to be purely TMS. Thanks.
     
  2. BeWell

    BeWell Well known member

    Hi music321,

    It is possible to have injury from what you descried with handle on garage door. Is there swelling?

    Keep eye on it. If there is no swelling and the pain gets worse you may have a Doctor to look at your forearm to ensure there is no injury.

    If you have no allergy to Tylenol, or Ibuprofen, they can also help in the meantime till the pain subsides.

    As far as lifting things. Doctor Sarno said if you can lift something, it is not too heavy for you to manage. If it were too heavy, you would not be able to lift it. Pacing yourself with physical work is always advisable. Especially if you are not regularly doing such work. Take regular breaks to let your body adjust while you are lifting things.
     
  3. BeWell

    BeWell Well known member

    I have both injuries at times and TMS that I used to think were injuries. When there is no bruising or swelling, then I blame TMS. Even if there is mild swelling, I still put some blame on TMS for amplifying pain.

    For injury I take Tylenol and still focus on my emotional balance to keep the pain to a minimum.
     
  4. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    There's no bruising/swelling. There is a hard knot at the site of the pain.
     
  5. BeWell

    BeWell Well known member

    If you can take something like Tylenol, no allergies that is, and if you can wait till the morning to see how your forearm feels, maybe you can get a good night sleep.

    But if there is no improvement in the morning, think about getting your arm looked at. Dr. Sarno always said to get a Doctor to look at your problem first.
     
  6. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    Thanks. I'm not even going to bother getting it looked at. The doctor won't be able to tell me anything, just charge me $. As for not being able to lift things, I don't know if I believe this. This is how I injured my leg 6 weeks ago, by following this advice. I don't know if it's a real injury or not, but I have heard of weight lifters tearing muscle when lifting. look at the link, it describes such a case:

    https://cavemanpowerlifters.wordpress.com/category/torn-pectoral/ (torn pectoral | Caveman Powerlifters)
     
  7. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    Dr. Sarno said: "If it's too heavy to lift, you couldn't lift it." I don't mean to be insensitive or unsympathetic, but the thought that you could hurt yourself by the act of turning a garage door handle without being in the "now" I find amusing. That should be good news to you, I hope you take it that way.
     
  8. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    When you have a traumatic injury, you know it right then and there. A real injury in the context of what you describe would have swelling, excruciating pain and ecchymosis.
     
  9. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    Thanks. This is precisely what I was hoping to hear.
     
  10. BeWell

    BeWell Well known member

    Hi music321,

    I admire your can do spirit. You say you have classic fibromyalgia, are very weak and deconditioned from years of TMS. Also, you are reluctant to spend money.

    You sound like a lot of people I know!

    You know what to do. If the pain subsides, then smile inwardly and say to yourself....I beat you again TMS!

    Given by your description of yourself. I would trust Dr. Sarno's words. Get checked by Medical Doctor when in doubt.
     
  11. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    I've been trying to find this quote. What Sarno book/page is it? thanks.
     
  12. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    I'm on the road and don't have my "Sarno's" with me, hopefully someone reading the Good Doctor now will come across it--or you can dig into the good books and discover it.
     

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