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Acrobatics and pain

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Romain, Apr 9, 2021.

  1. Romain

    Romain New Member

    Hello everybody,
    Here is my question:
    After 4 years of hiatus, I returned to sport.
    Since then I feel much stronger!
    Only now, my lower back is very arched and sensitive to pain.
    My osteopath puts my vertebrae back in place regularly, they tend to move, especially after sport (acrobatics on the ground).
    I would also add that I have suffered from anxiety for several years.
    I have the impression that my emotional state creates muscle tension which in turn creates spinal movements ...
    Do you think this is possible?
    Because it bothers me a lot on a daily basis and in my sleep.
    I have to take ibuprofen for the pain ...
    Help :)
     
  2. Baseball65

    Baseball65 Beloved Grand Eagle

    You might want to Read "Healing back pain" by Dr. Sarno. There is no way for your spine to go "in" and "out".... All of chiropractic and adjustment is pure 100% Placebo and pseudo science. Sarno pointed out.... it takes HUNDREDS of pounds of pressure to even slightly move a vertebrae. Even in traction (placebo) the weights used are in the 20-40 lb range.... not even close to being able to 'adjust' something.

    In 2013 I fell off of a ladder from the second story. I did not get checked out too thoroughly because I had severed my thumb in the fall and was obsessed with them attaching it back correctly. About 2015 I was in for a look at my Gall bladder. The Doctor told me "You have a fall in the last few years??...you have a broken vertebrae that has healed up from something very recent?".
    I had Broken the vertebrae in my spine during that fall... It had healed by itself WITH ME WORKING EVERY day!!!!! At my manual labor job. I had zero back pain during that time.

    The spine is not some delicate gossamer that the modern medical world would have you believe... we are super evolved , divinely existing warrior spawn and can do anything...in any position.... for a long time.

    Dr. Sarno explains all of this in "Healing Back Pain".
     
    FredAmir likes this.
  3. FredAmir

    FredAmir Well known member

    Awesome story Baseball65. Thanks for sharing.

    My suggestions for Romain are:
    1. Stop doubting your body
    2. You are stronger than you think
    3. Stop all physical treatments
    4. Go on living and enjoying life

    All of the above can help reduce tension and TMS.

    take care,
     
    Baseball65 likes this.
  4. Romain

    Romain New Member

    Thanks for the answer, and what do you think of my arched back? Is it a TMS? Is it the nervous system that contracts the muscles?
    So anxiety?
    And the fact that after each workout my back hurts? Still TMS?
    Because it always comes back ...
    Sometimes my muscles tighten only 2 or 3 hours after my visit to the osteopath, while I did nothing physical ...
     
  5. TG957

    TG957 Beloved Grand Eagle

    That is absolutely correct. It is a typical fight or flight response. Your muscles contract in response to anxiety and fear, unconsciously. It is an evolutionary mechanism developed to prepare us to run from dangers. I tend to have tight muscles and tension headaches, which gets worse when I am stressed or did not have enough sleep. Your back may hurt after workout because you are probably unconsciously worried about hurting yourself.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2021
  6. FredAmir

    FredAmir Well known member

    1. what do you think of my arched back? Is it a TMS? Is it the nervous system that contracts the muscles?
    It could be combination of things.

    2. And the fact that after each workout my back hurts? Still TMS? Are you working with a trainer> Is your form correct?

    3. Sometimes my muscles tighten only 2 or 3 hours after my visit to the osteopath, while I did nothing physical? TMS!

    So it could be combination of things. A consultation with a TMS doctor doing a physical exam can help determine what's really happening
     

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