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90% better* ...are we fooling ourselves?

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by scottyboy8, Dec 16, 2015.

  1. scottyboy8

    scottyboy8 Peer Supporter

    Hi all,

    I am so sorry to bring negativity to the forum, but I see that everyone is always 90% better.

    I have started having my doubts. Are we just fooling ourselves/removing the anxiety?

    Someone please knock some sense into me...

    Thanks,
    Scott
     
  2. mike2014

    mike2014 Beloved Grand Eagle

    Scott,

    It's not being negative at all. TMS is a life long journey for most of us, as long as we live, love, breathe we will continue to suffer mind body symptoms, which can vary in severity. However, we can become better at understanding ourselves and the very emotions that cause our pain. If we can become better at understanding our emotions we can become more in tune with our body and reduce or improve the symptoms we feel.

    TMS healing is not an overnight process and takes time, we are likely to see many relapses, but it's important to count the successes and maintain a fearless heart.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2015
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  3. scottyboy8

    scottyboy8 Peer Supporter

    Thank you so much for the reply. What you say makes total sense. I have been trying to heal for over a year now though. However, I would say I am now on the symptom imperative stage (pain has moved side). Thanks, Scott
     
  4. Simplicity

    Simplicity Guest

    Beautifully said, Mike.
     
  5. Cap'n Spanky

    Cap'n Spanky Well known member

    No, I don't think people are fooling themselves. But that's a decision you'll have to make for yourself.

    By the way, my back pain is 100% gone, except on very, very rare occasions. When I do notice it (maybe once a year), it is very mild and it does not concern me. My tennis elbow is completely gone and has never returned. So complete recovery is very possible.
     
  6. JacketSpud

    JacketSpud Peer Supporter

    I don't know about everyone else, but I have to say, I thought the same thing. Really? 90%. Are these people really still bad but somehow feuding themselves. But here is a brief version of my story. I had occipital headaches. ALL the time. For 18 months. One afternoon not long after they started I went to the chiro and got two hours of no pain. Then in April I found massage that could give me a week of no pain. One week in to the SEP in October I was journaling and the pain went away. I was COMPLETELY head pain free for THREE whole weeks (not all my pains in other body areas have been so improved but the head is the part I'm most concerned with because even thinking was painful). The pain came back after the three weeks, lasted a day, then vanished. Currently, I might get some nerve pain every once in a while or a migraine, but here in talking maybe once or twice in a two week period. When I started this I didn't think it was possible and really thought the 90%ers were really fooling themselves. But I totally get it now. I'd say head wise I'm at the 98% mark. I still have other concerns I need to work on, but I'm confident that as I keep working through things (I've completed the SEP and am now using unlearn your pain) I can get even better.

    Good luck with your recovery.
     
    MWsunin12 likes this.
  7. MWsunin12

    MWsunin12 Beloved Grand Eagle

    In the big picture: Why does it matter if we are or aren't fooling ourselves?
    If the mind says "enough," after you look at and accept the psychological aspects then it was your mind fooling your body all along, right?
    My thought on the 10% is that it takes a while to change the pathways to which our brains have become accustomed.
    If we are people who are used to being anxious and stressed, then our brains want to take the route of least resistance,
    until we convince them to do otherwise by constantly reminding ourselves that it's emotional.
    This is what I'm finding to be the case for me, anyway.
     
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