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Derek S. tms and add

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by TeriL, May 27, 2016.

  1. TeriL

    TeriL New Member

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    TMS and ADD?

    I have the feeling that ADD or ADHD may be related to TMS. Does anyone have any thoughts? I have problems with keeping my attention on a task and tend to get started with things but never finish. I have other ADD tendencies and have been diagnosed with mild ADD by a therapist. It stresses me out quite a bit with my disorganization and I get frustrated that I am working on a million things at once bouncing around. I cured 20 year back pain by reading Sarno's books and currently have digestion troubles.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 31, 2016
  2. peter32963

    peter32963 Newcomer

     
  3. peter32963

    peter32963 Newcomer

    We are in the same boat. And you hit on the nose. I also personally could care less if anyone disagrees with me because I know from my own experiences I am totally right here.

    ADD is a distraction mechanism to pull you away from your emotional thinking . Its the most advanced form of tms. What it consists of are muscle tension dysruptions inside your inner ear that are constantly occurring when ever you have a negative emotional thought. the muscles tighten up around 3 small bones that relate to tinnitus ringing in your ears. Also it messes with your inner ear organs that pertain to balance and cognitive percepton. It's one big theatrical act to distract you. And it happens to people who where taught to repress their feelings early on from childhood. Your brain gets this crazy idea with dysfunctional modeling early on that it needs to be repressive and hyper react and emotially repress anything negative.

    Its the exact same mechanism trying to distract you with acid relux, lower back pain, sneezing attacks, excessive urination and more depending on the person.

    I faught my way out of this condition up to having just a little of the add disruptions left. Everything else is gone.

    It usually centers on one life long emotionally repressed issue.

    The fact you still have acid reflux and add means you didn't fully cure your self or bring out the repressed issue yet.

    Bottom line per sarnos books once the issue is brought to surface clearly all symptoms go away. And for some people this could even take therapy.

    The way I am able to bring it to the surface is by reading his daily reminders in healing back pain. Sometimes the whole page but more often just this and sharpy shifting my attention to my emotional thoughts. Do this for a while over and over and u will start to become consciously aware of your repressed issue.


    I will not be concerned or intimidated by the symptoms.
    I will shift my attention from the symptoms to emotional issues.
    I intend to be in control, not my subconscious mind
    I must think psychological at all times not physical.

    regards

    peter32963@gmail.com
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2016
    Tennis Tom likes this.
  4. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    Do you believe that DX is correct?
     
  5. TeriL

    TeriL New Member

    I do think it is correct however I feel I really don't even need a diagnosis because I have almost all the symptoms for ADD and it brings me tremendous stress sometimes. I don't like to label myself because it feels permanent and they say that a person will have it forever. What I really wonder about is why I have the these type of symptoms it and I don't believe there is a chemical imbalance that requires drugs but I am starting to believe that it is tied to emotions and is a distraction just like perfectionism is a distraction. I have perfectionism and ADD symptoms which don't get along very well together. For example: My house should be perfectly neat and tidy but it's not because I'm horrible at picking up organizing.
     
  6. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    Very interesting! Sounds like ADD may be another TMS affective equivalent like OCD, etc. Maybe the TMS therapists will comment, I'm just a tennis player.
     
  7. Lizzy

    Lizzy Well known member

    Has anyone learned more about ADD being a TMS equivalent? I have ADD, and it is definitely worse when something is bothering me.

    I grew up with an angry and verbally abusive father. I have few memories from before age 12, but my memories are of being afraid of him. He postured a lot, causing me to fear he might become physical, even though experience would have told me he never did. He seemed always to be on the edge of losing control.

    Was i taught to repress emotions? My dad loved to tell how we lived with his parents until I was 6 months old, when we purchased a house. My grandma rocked me to sleep every night and I had a pacifier. In our new house I was put down to bed with no pacifier. I cried for a week, but no more spoiled baby. I learned to sleep without one.

    I know many babies have received this treatment but I think it is usually when everything has been tried and parents are at their wit's end.
    Anyway, interesting.
     
  8. ladyofthelake

    ladyofthelake Peer Supporter

    No insights. I have ADHD and awareness and treatment for that has helped me with caring for my needs because I suck at establishing priorities and for years and years I ran around doing EVERYTHING at once. Just raising my hand here.
     
    Lizzy likes this.
  9. Lizzy

    Lizzy Well known member

    Ladyofthelake,
    I totally agree!
    Lol, when I was a teenager I was a camp counselor. I remember a camper pointing out that I was half dressed, bunk half made and some other things half done that after 35 years I've forgotten. That is me all over

    Setting priories is a challenge for me, but necessary, and even then I will be doing other things along the way. Haha, part of my charm.
    Lizzy
     

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