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Alan G. Residual pain from yeast infection

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Guest, May 30, 2015.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I had a vaginal yeast infection for about 2 months before I took Miconostat. It seemed to work to get rid of the yeast but I still have burning and irritation of the vulvular area and it's been about 3 weeks since I used Miconostat 3. The yeast is gone but the pain remains. Could this be TMS? A dermatologist prescribed a topical steroid for a week but it didn't help and he didn't see any redness or irritated looking skin. Now he has me on econazole nitrate 1% cream applied externally only in case there is still yeast externally (which I doubt cause I have no more itching, just burning and no discharge). I read about vulvodynia and how sometimes after yeast infections the nerves keep firing pain signals to the brain even when there is no reason for it. I am familiar with Dr. Sarno's book so I thought maybe it could be TMS. Any thoughts would be appreciated! Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 1, 2015
  2. Alan Gordon LCSW

    Alan Gordon LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    The following response was contributed by Stephanie Prendergast, Director of the Pelvic Health and Rehabilitation Center:

    Yeast infections are a know cause of persisting vulvar pain. Two months is an excessive period of time to have an active infection and it sounds like the woman asking the question is experiencing the consequences of an initially unmanaged infection vs a TMS-driven mechanism. The infection itself is a painful stimulus that irritates the vulvar tissue. The pelvic floor muscles contract in response to the pain from the infection and may remain tight after the infection has cleared. Additionally, the vulvar connective tissue and nerves will be also be negatively affected by the infection.This is a problem because tight muscles, connective tissue changes, and nerve irritation can then all cause vulvar pain that mimics a yeast infection even though there is not an active infection. These impairments and symptoms can be treated with medical management to prevent further infections and to help manage the pain and pelvic floor physical therapy to address the musculoskeletal consequences of the infection.


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  3. JD1

    JD1 New Member

    Dear Guest:

    While I agree Dr. Prendergast's response, I would add that in my experience chronic pelvic pain (including vulvodynia) can be TMS. I suffered from unexplained pelvic pain for a year following a confirmed urinary tract infection (the only one of my life). I was treated for pelvic floor dysfunction with physical therapy for several months with mild improvement. My pain lessened significantly once I began TMS healing, including working with a TMS doctor and a TMS therapist (which I'm still doing and am forever grateful). If your symptoms ultimately do not respond to traditional medical treatment and your doctors cannot find any medical reasons for your pain, I would suggest you consult with a TMS doctor.
     
  4. Jojo61

    Jojo61 Peer Supporter

    Hi guest,

    I believe this can be TMS. My baby and I had trush for a few months. I had never had it before. I am breastfeeding so we kept giving it back to eachother. We both finally seemed to have gotten rid of it when the pain came back... but none of the other symptoms. So I came to the conclusion that it had to be my brain trying out another way to distract me. I told myself the pain wasn't physical but emotional and ignored it. Within half a day it went away and hasn't come back since. I know it can be an akward subject to talk about but it can really affect your life. I hope you find a way to beat it soon.
     
  5. michael91

    michael91 Newcomer

    Hi,

    If you got rid of the infection and it pain/other sensations still remains it could be a TMS equivalent. Try to relax those pelvic muscles by scanning them (reiki style), and calming down your mind (i.e. 'it is OK nothing to worry'). For me, I still have a yeast infection which should be treated with cream. Somehow my muscles/nerves are stuck/contracted I think. Because redness and skin flakes are still there. I found out that doing some squats I can get some relief (temporarily subsides for a certain amount - hard to believe ;) for me). Also, use minimal toilet paper on affected areas (maybe some source of irritation). Also, I tried different brands of creams: Triamcinolonacetonidecrème FNA, followed by daktarin which gave me some relief.
     

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