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Derek S. How do I know tinnitus tms?

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by hopefuldan, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. hopefuldan

    hopefuldan New Member

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    In response to a TMS question about recovery, part of Dr. Schubiner's response is one's "ability to recognize the process as TMS and to clearly understand that there is no physical reason why they cannot get better ". My question is, how do we know whether our symptom is TMS and not a physical issue? In my case, I have tinnitus (which Sarno lists as a TMS symptom), and I have been checked out by doctors and nothing was wrong with me (except normal hearing loss which most people my age (51) have). The problem is, I can never know for sure if I have TMS and not some structural problem. I can never fully "clearly understand there is no physical reason why cannot get better".

    Therefore am I doomed to fail this program? This program seems very much hinged on whether a person can accept that their symptom is not a result of a structural problem, but how can we ever know for sure?
     
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for your question, hopefuldan.

    I know that tinnitus seems like it is somehow different from other TMS symptoms but I would argue that it is not. It is a fairly common experience/sensation that your primitive brain can interpret as a threat and then subsequently re-create leading to a pattern of attention, preoccupation, fear, and anxiety.

    With any TMS symptom, you eventually reach a fork in the road when you are forced to make some kind of a leap of faith. You can have doctors tell you that there is nothing wrong with your back, that your MRI's came out clean, or that there is no structural damage in your ears which should cause a chronic ringing in your ears. There is no certainty in any of these scenarios. There is only the assertion from people like Dr. Schubiner, Dr. Sarno, or an experienced TMS clinician that the psychogenic pain/symptom process is both extremely common and also the most likely explanation for the symptom in the absence of any structural deficits. This has to be enough to make that leap of faith.

    You state that you can "never know for sure" if this is TMS or a structural issue, but you also report that structural damage has already been ruled out. To me that gives you as much certainty as you need. If you need to get a second opinion, by all means do so. However, make a deal with yourself that once you have enough evidence, you will commit fully to the TMS approach.

    It is common and expected to wrestle with uncertainty around TMS symptoms because they can be so compelling. Gather your evidence and then move forward with confidence and hope. You will have moments of doubt but as long as you've done your due diligence making your case for TMS, you will find your certainty again.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

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    hopefuldan and JanAtheCPA like this.
  3. JanAtheCPA

    JanAtheCPA Beloved Grand Eagle

    Key phrase bolded by me.

    This is SO important to keep at the top of your anti-TMS affirmations: "This symptom is not dangerous, this is my primitive brain, constantly on the lookout for danger, that wants me to interpret it as dangerous so I will stay alert and worried."

    And again. I call it a 180-degree mind shift, but it's exactly the same thing.

    To recover, you MUST change the way you currently think, which means changing those messages in your brain that create doubt. That's your primitive brain creating the doubt.

    Take charge of your primitive brain, change the messages, be mindful, and become fully conscious, fully aware, and fully free.
     

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