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Alan G. carpal tunnel syndrome

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Guest, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Hello,

    I have had mild carpal tunnel symptoms in my hands on and off for a few years, which lately has got worse.
    I wondered if you know of anyone who has had carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosed by nerve conduction study who has got better through the TMS route?

    Thank you,
    Z
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 12, 2016
  2. Alan Gordon LCSW

    Alan Gordon LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Hello Z,
    In carpal tunnel syndrome, nerve conduction studies show that there is partial nerve root compression (as is my understanding).

    What makes things more complex is that the TMS orthopedists I've spoken with have said that there is a 20-30% false positive rate in these nerve conduction studies. This means, as far as it was explained to me, that even if nerve conduction studies show partial nerve root compression, that doesn't necessarily mean that it's so.

    This makes things more complex of course. Dr. David Schechter, a TMS physician in Los Angeles, emphasizes that the exam is the crucial component in determining whether nerve root compression is the likely cause of the symptoms, he does not like to rely on nerve conduction studies alone (in fact, he often doesn't like to even conduct these tests unless the physical exam warrants it, specifically due to this false positive rate.)

    So I'd suggest that you consult with a TMS physician who specializes in orthopedics to help you most clearly determine the true cause of your pain.

    Alan


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  3. TG957

    TG957 Well known member

    I have a CTS diagnosis as of a year ago, with positive EMG. The actual CTS symptoms, after 8 months of TMS approach are substantially reduced. As a matter of fact, I was specifically told not to put pressure on my wrists, but my hands feel much better when I do. I subscribe 100% to Dr. Sarno's position that CTS is most likely TMS, unless you operate heavy machinery for living.
     
    stradivarius likes this.
  4. NicoleB34

    NicoleB34 Well known member

    i know this is old, but i was reading back posts :) I have something called Pudendal Neuralgia, and it also supposedly has an "entrapment" component. I have not had an EMG, and i will not, because i do not believe i have any entrapment issues (if you go back in my history, it was irritation from an injection that started my pain). So think of it like Carpal Tunnel of the pelvis.

    However, we have members, including the famous Ezer, who also got a positive entrapment diagnosis thru nerve studies, but he has completely healed by treating his decade-long pain (and failed surgeries) as TMS. Why would he get a positive diagnosis thru and EMG? Well, most of us pelvic pain patients have something called pelvic floor dysfunction. The muscles are in an abnormal tight spasm. As i type this, i can feel myself "guarding" my pelvic muscles, I'm voluntarily (but without noticing it) sucking up my muscles. There are also internal pelvic muscles that can spasm and clench involuntarily. Many of us go to special PT, and we're told that our muscles down there, and surrounding those nerves, are very tight. So yes, it makes sense that involuntary muscle spasm can be grabbing onto those nerves, possibly skewing a nerve conduction test.

    I wouldn't be surprised if a similar thing is happening on a small level, to the nerves in the hand and wrist.
     
  5. stradivarius

    stradivarius Peer Supporter

    Thanks Nicole and TG957, very reassuring. Will check out Ezer's story.
     
  6. TG957

    TG957 Well known member

    I am very happy to report that I am now 95% recovered, without any steroid injections or surgeries. I can do 25 push-ups in a row, more than ever before, I am able to get into a hand stand and hold it, and I see no limitations in how I use my wrists. I still have very minor numbness in my fingers but it does not bother me a bit.
     
  7. stradivarius

    stradivarius Peer Supporter

    TG957, that is wonderful news! Enjoy your new freedom!
     
  8. TG957

    TG957 Well known member

    stradivarius, I hope you are doing better, too!
     

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