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Daniel L. Tricky knee pain

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by stanz, Aug 31, 2015.

  1. stanz

    stanz New Member

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I am a firm believer in TMS methodology, having had 14 years of progressively worsening back pain that could not be treated with traditional approaches. After suffering from 1979 to 1993, I read Dr. Sarno's book, attended one session at Rusk, and have been basically free of back pain and sciatica since that time.

    However, the site of pain seems to migrate to different locations, and I have to remember that TMS doesn't confine itself to the back.

    My current situation: I have been an avid runner and cyclist for 45 years. My life currently is extremely stressful with work and teen-daughter problems. Almost two weeks ago, after a particularly strenuous bike ride, my right knee started hurting while descending stairs. Two weeks of rest and physical therapy have not provided any relief whatsoever.

    My hunch is that this is just another bout of TMS, but I don't want to develop a chronic condition with my knees in the event it is not. Interestingly enough, my two sisters, several weeks before my "injury," reported knee pain, and a good friend was complaining of her upcoming knee-replacement surgery a day or so before my problems started.

    Thoughts? Strategies? I'm going crazy not running or cycling. It provides tremendous relief from the struggles facing me these days.

    Thanks for any assistance you can provide.
     
  2. Daniel G Lyman LCSW

    Daniel G Lyman LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    As always, the first thing I recommend is going to get checked out by a TMS physician, or a physician you trust not to diagnose you with something solely because they feel obligated to diagnose.

    That said, it sounds like this is TMS. And remember, the best thing you can do with TMS is not to worry about it. Knee pain comes and goes (I’m a runner and cyclist myself, and I’ve had plenty of knee pains that meant absolutely nothing).

    Go for an easy ride or a shorter run. Just take it easy on yourself. Don’t cut those things out entirely, but be nice to yourself. If your knee starts to hurt while exercising, then take a break and calm yourself down. Go back to the exercise if you feel confident, or otherwise just stop. Remind yourself that you’ll be fine.

    Remember, TMS pain is your body’s barometer. It’s telling you that you need to slow down your life a bit.


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    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

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