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Kamil L The Science behind Somatic Tracking

Discussion in 'Tell Me About Your Pain Q&A' started by Guest, Jun 18, 2020.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    Question
    Hi, I love the episode on somatic tracking, I feel like I have a really good handle on how to do it. But I don’t totally understand why it works. Why does paying attention to the sensation through a lens of safety turn off the pain?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 18, 2020
  2. Kamil Lewis AMFT

    Kamil Lewis AMFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Hi!

    This is a fantastic question. It sounds like you have a good grasp on the "what", but are curious about the "why". Pain is a danger signal. A lot of times, when we experience pain, the next reaction is to be afraid of it. When the fear intensifies, so does the pain. Attending to our symptoms through a lens of safety, and without pressure, teaches your brain that the sensation is not as terrifying as you might have originally anticipated. When you reduce the fear response, the pain in effect reduces as well. Essentially, you're taking away the very thing that keeps your pain active, which is a fear response. By instead replacing fear with messages of safety, you're gently taking care of yourself, becoming more regulated, and taking the power away from the pain.

    Thanks for your question and keep up the great work!


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