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Spring fever?

Discussion in 'Support Subforum' started by Waterbear, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. Waterbear

    Waterbear Peer Supporter

    I think I'm doing well. I'm doing more and with less pain.

    Recently, I've been getting impatient, and I think that's bad. A few days ago, I posted a mile time on here, 3 days ago I broke it by a full minute. I had pain ( because I freaked myself out at the quick time not being safe) but that's subsided.

    Now I've been getting mad if I have pain while walking because I know I can run.


    I've been feeling, restless. I'm so close to running like my old self, I can taste it and I want it. I want it more than anything else. It tastes like the best thing in the world.

    I know that's not good though. Running shouldn't be my "drug". I should be happy w/o it.

    Any advise for getting over this hump? Just keep on keeping on with TMS studies?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    I understand your impatience. You've been running great and should just try not to
    think of any pain while you run. That's what Steve Ozanich said worked for him.

    If thoughts of pain come up, distract your mind. Think of running with someone you like or love.
    Think you're running together in the most beautiful place you can imagine or ever have been.

    Don't think that running is your "drug." Be happy with it. It's what you like to do. The more of those things the better.

    Enjoy your run. That's the main thing.
     
    Waterbear likes this.
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Beloved Grand Eagle

    Good to hear you are doing so well, Waterbear.

    My suggestion is to make running into a mindfulness meditation. Try to be totally in the present moment when running. It is the comparison with the 'past you' that is the problem. The past you is gone, but the present you can be even better--it may not be as fast but the experience can be richer, more meaningful. Redefine what enjoyable running is. Enjoy the now, and there is no impatience to get to the future.
     
    Msunn likes this.
  4. Waterbear

    Waterbear Peer Supporter

    Good advise! I will try that tonight.
     
  5. Alex Bloom LCSW

    Alex Bloom LCSW TMS Therapist

    Hi Waterbear,

    Just a quick piece of perspective. So often I see my clients' symptoms being centered around the things they love. I can't tell you how many times I've hear "If only I could do yoga/climb/sing/run/hike/ride then I wouldn't have to worry about all this stuff". It's almost as though people feel as though they could keep on how they had been before the symptoms if only they had those beloved crutches. While I don't mean to take away from these activities in any way, I think it is an important dynamic that needs to be confronted. So much of the work around overcoming TMS has to do with changing old habits and patterns. Your body and subconscious are telling you that the old way of doing things isn't working! So any sort of excuse to go back to old patterns is essentially something to avoid.

    I mention this as a something to be aware of as you feel the impatience coming up around running. What is it that is driving those feelings of impatience? Is it the sense that once you can run your troubles will be at an end? If that's the case it's time to examine that belief. We know that the old way of doing things got you in this trouble in the first place so it is important to be aware of the temptation to slip back into those patterns.

    As advised by the other posters, try to see if you can look to running as something you do for yourself, not something you need in order to progress. And remember that pressure can come from pushing yourself too hard, OR from being hard on yourself for being "dangerous" as you describe feeling after speeding up your time. Do what feels good for you because you deserve it, not because it fits in with your idea of what you should or shouldn't be doing. That gives power back to your symptoms.
     

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