1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Our TMS drop-in chat is tomorrow (Saturday) from 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern (NY) Standard time. It's a great way to get quick and interactive peer support, with Celayne as your host. Look for the red Chat flag on top of the menu bar!

Derek S. Restless leg syndrome

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Guest, Jan 17, 2016.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I am being treated for Restless Leg Syndrome. (Pills and stay hydrated)) Is there any chance that my RLS could be TMS related. If so what are my options.

    Jim McGlynn
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2016
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for your question. I have a very difficult time understanding restless leg syndrome through any kind of structural lens. There are a few legitimate medical conditions that could cause restless legs including anemia, thyroid problems, or vein thrombosis.

    Assuming no pathology is present, the only thing that makes sense to me to describe restless legs has to do with low dopamine levels in the brain. Low dopamine levels are frequently linked to depression\anxiety or medication/drug effects or withdrawal.

    I personally had this symptom multiple times and tried treating it with medication which didn't help. I believe that RLS is absolutely a TMS equivalent and that the the most effective approach would be to make healthy lifestyle changes and practice emotional hygiene. These were the things that made a difference for me. I have also treated patients who had success with a TMS approach and healthy lifestyle.

    Best of luck to you.

    -Derek


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
  3. fibri

    fibri New Member

    Hi, I suspect that restless leg is one of my TMS symptoms. However, I do have a quick fix to suggest. I always get RL when lying in bed at night, and often while watching TV. I have found that if I empty my bladder, it stops. Even if I just emptied my bladder half an hour ago, and don't feel the need, I go anyway. It always works. Always. Without fail. If it continues or starts again, I repeat and then it's gone.

    Hope this trick can help you too.
     
    Forest and IrishSceptic like this.
  4. sosparkly

    sosparkly New Member

    Hi Jim,
    I've suffered with RLS in the past. I think it is TMS related, in that the muscle contraction (lack of oxygen) causes the muscles to burn a lot of magnesium. So, I take 300mg of magnesium when I feel RLS symptoms. Works like a charm!

    All the best!
     
  5. Lynn P.

    Lynn P. Newcomer

    Hi, Jim
    I also take 320mgs. of calcium citrate and 99mgs of potassium when I have restless leg syndrome. Definitely works.
     

Share This Page