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PT 2: 100% TMS ? Pain as early age 13 - high intensity sports

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by whalesy, Jun 25, 2020.

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100% TMS?

  1. Yes

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  2. No

    0 vote(s)
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  1. whalesy

    whalesy New Member

    PT 2: Edit 6/24/20:
    Right now, I am concerned about left foot/ankle/knee pain that I experience. I haven't fully been able to think away this pain and there is a divot in my lower left quad.



    PT 1: So I polevaulted, year-round, ages 12-18, which are some quite physically formative years. Polevaulting is one of the most difficult AND repetitively lopsided sports in the world. I was nationally ranked so I was doing a intense sport, intensely.

    Simultaneously, I played volleyball ages 11-16, in the Fall. And swam ages 7-12 in the Summer (2000-2005).

    I'm 26 now and have experienced chronic pain for the past 12 years. I started volleyball Fall 2006, where a coach told me at the end of the season I was going to wreck my shoulder if I kept serving the way I did.

    I started diving in the summer of 2006 and did that in summer 2007 also. Fall 2006 I played volleyball and kept serving the way I was because I was good at it.
    Started track/polevaulting in spring 2007. Played volleyball in Fall 2007 and *started P.T. for my shoulder in the beginning of 2008, which wasn't helpful--or good P.T.* as I came to find out. I remember bringing it up to my mom and she brushed it off as growing pains--brought it up maybe every month/every couple months and then less because I was suppose to grow out of it.

    jan 2008 pt
    jan 2009 ~fall 2009 pt

    Continued to run track/polevault. And play volleyball, that ending in Fall 2009 because I was having shoulder and now connected back pain and P.T. wasn't helping me with that (yes, I went back for my shoulder/back Fall? 2009) Got an MRI for the shoulder which was normal. I remember not being able to sleep on my shoulder--figured the shoulder/back pain was from volleyball, and to give it up, and I was better at polevaulting anyway.

    The pain never really went away. Summer 2010 I spent the summer being treated for left foot pain to no avail. All the pain was debilitating to the point I developed hip/foot pain and couldn't walk without pain, or polevault Fall 2010 age 16. Did find a great P.T. who got me polevaulting again, but I was wrapped up with tape.

    Had a concussion Dec 2013 symptoms lasting heavily for 2 years--still on/off light sensitivity. Jan. 2013 bumped head and concussion symptoms came back. Now in P.T. for neck/shoulder.

    I yelled at neck, elbows, left knee, and shoulder pain to stop it and got all but shoulder to relax.

    I am 1000% am experiencing TMS to a large degree--accepted the diagnosis and shortly after have seen amazing progress--did pushups! which I haven't attempted for years. And my elbow pain made substantial progress in ~a week. However, the hours spent in/out P.T. since 2008, Polevaulting being one of the most difficult AND repetitively lopsided sports in the world, and shoulders known for being one of the most complex/tricky joints to rehab., the progress I've made/having limited resources for P.T., I am cautious to accept the TMS diagnosis 100% for my shoulder.

    I am at the tail end of P.T. for my shoulder.

    Edit:
    Ok, it has to be TMS for my shoulder: when I relax/tell this new clicking in my shoulder to go away, it does. Normal pain doesn't do that: TMS does.

    Naturally, my shoulder is going to be sore returning to physical activity, doing physical activity more vigorously, living life more vigorously and physically--and doing push-ups, pull-ups 2 years after not attempting them. Stuff is going to be moving around, of course :)

    Normal pain can't be thought away. Normal pain can't be ignored and go away. TMS pain can. Wow, that's a relief !!!

    I am not sure about my left leg though.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2020

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