1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Our TMS drop-in chat is tomorrow (Saturday) from 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern (now US Daylight Time) . It's a great way to get quick and interactive peer support, with Enrique as your host. Look for the red Chat flag on top of the menu bar!

Alex B. Pain medication

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by etnier, Nov 18, 2016.

  1. etnier

    etnier Newcomer

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Is it possible that taking a pain medication could actually work in a positive way in that by letting one forget about the pain for a while, which means that you stop giving it attention, the brain has to stop doing its thing too. In fact, if you kept the pain in abeyance with a pain killer for a long enough period of time, the brain might even give up trying to distract you and the pain would go away for lack of attention. I know this sounds crazy and I think I know the answer, but I'd like to see it in writing because, though my pain is moderately better than it was before I started on TMS a few weeks ago, each time it flares up badly and I allow myself some relief via the Bufferin I wonder and worry whether I'm being smart or dumb.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 19, 2016
  2. Alex Bloom LCSW

    Alex Bloom LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Hi etnier, thanks for the question.

    This can be a tricky subject, and I know different people will approach this in different ways. My understanding of the rationale behind the "no medication" idea is that it helps you to avoid becoming dependent on something physical to deal with your pain. In other words, by associating relief with pain meds rather than with the interventions you employ when approaching it from a TMS perspective, it becomes very difficult to not associate progress with the meds themselves and the idea that you need them to feel better. Things can also get tricky when the unexpected happens. For example, the medication may suddenly stop working, or perhaps you're caught somewhere without it. In those situations we want you to be able to understand that the pain can't actually harm you but instead is an indication that you need to address things from a psychological perspective.

    Now I have had some clients who have used anxiety medication to address underlying issues, which I don't think is necessarily counterproductive. I have also had clients who have been in such pain that they wanted to just give themselves some relief and so took pain killers. If this is necessary, then it's not the end of the world. While the overall goal is to wean away from them, there is no benefit in brutalizing yourself.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
    Dfw and JanAtheCPA like this.
  3. Dfw

    Dfw Peer Supporter

    In my own experience I have used different methods including some light medications and physical therapy to "get me over the hump". Although that was not being dependent upon these items to facilitate recovery of TMS symptoms, but rather a crutch for a short period of time. Once I learned physical improvements and coping skills I was able to move from PT to just employing a trainer to assit me in maximizing my gym time. I as well, use any medications very very sparingly, during difficult times only.

    To me, and I am not speaking for anyone but myself, I feel a little extra help now and then never hurts. Keeping physically active is not a crutch but rather an essential part of the TMS recovery process.
     
  4. etnier

    etnier Newcomer

    I am very grateful for both these responses....especially today because yesterday I forced myself through a day of agony. I had some success when I told my TMS that I wasn't going to pay attention to the pain, so it might as well give it and go away, but today I got so tired of it, I finally gave up and took 2 bufferin. I do this very rarely but I'm a 76 year-old woman and I just began to feel it wasn't right to be in agony when relief is just a Bufferin away. So thank you for both your answers. I think I needed them as much as the Bufferin.
     

Share This Page