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Derek S. Pain going and coming

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Jay1986, Jul 13, 2015.

  1. Jay1986

    Jay1986 Newcomer

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Hi everyone. I have been suffering from back and legs pain from almost 3 years. The pain in the legs is realky different and i can feel the pain starting from my lower back and goin down to my heals with burning sensation also. This week its at its worst. Last week the pain was not there and i was feeling good but after a whole good week the pain came back again while i was lifting some thing. It always happen I will go with no pain and good mood for a week. And the pain comes back at it worst everytime and bring the fatigue with it every time. I dont knw what to do. I try my best but this pain always put back me at the same poistion where i start and demotivate me all the time. Any help :(
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 23, 2015
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for the question, Jay1986.

    The cycle that you describe is pretty classic behavior for TMS. The pain will reappear and will serve the purpose of either getting you back in the fear/preoccupation mindset OR it will put you back in a place of hopelessness/disempowerment. Both will try to convince you that you are "back to square one" and erase any progress that you have made (even if that progress is significant, which appears to be the case with you).

    Feeling confident and empowered, even in the face of symptoms, is one of the most important skills that you can hone to make the symptoms go away. This is difficult because of the urgency that every person who is in pain feels to be free of their symptoms for good.

    I want you to stop expecting yourself to be symptom-free. Focus on being outcome independent and if the fatigue and pain come back, don't allow that to be a determinant of whether or not you're making progress. Be patient with your personal recovery process and remind yourself how far you have come. Encourage yourself to continue all of the hard work that you have done to get to this place in your recovery. The symptoms will come and go but you will remain steadfast and determined in your process.

    You just had a week with no symptoms! You deserve some credit for that and once this extinction burst fades away, you will be right back to where you were last week.

    Don't impose timeframes on yourself or set symptom-focused conditions for progress. Practice this mindset and be there for yourself in a kind and compassionate way. Every time the symptoms come back, use that as an opportunity to practice honing your attitude of outcome independence. Reframe the entire experience for yourself and don't allow the symptoms to have that much power.

    If you take away the purpose of the symptoms, they will not have a reason to keep coming back.

    Keep at it and you will get there!

    -Derek


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

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    Grateful17, IndiMarshall and Forest like this.
  3. Forest

    Forest Beloved Grand Eagle

    Great advice, Derek. Those deep insights need constant repetition. Thanks for sharing.
     
  4. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hi, Jay. It sure looks to me like your symptoms are pure TMS. You got excellent replies form Derek and Forest.

    TMS comes and goes because the subconscious knows you're working on the emotional causes of your back and leg pain.

    You need to keep discovering the emotional causes. If you haven't done the Structured Emotional Program yet,
    I suggest you start it. It's free in the subforum of this web site and will help you learn what your emotions are that cause TMS pain.
     

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