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NEW STUDY ON PAIN WHEN WALKING

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Walt Oleksy, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    UNIVERSITY STUDY ON PAIN WHEN WALKING

    Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine is starting a new study asking “Do you get pain in your legs when you walk?” They said it could be do to an arterial blood flow problem to your legs, also known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD), peripheral vascular disease, or intermittent claudication.” It’s called “The Propel Study.”

    They are looking for people to participate in the research study that may improve walking ability or reduce pain with walking.

    Free exercise sessions are to be given with an exercise physiologist three times a week or weekly health education sessions.

    They also going to give a medication that may improve walking ability or a placebo.

    Up to $85 will be offered as compensation for completing the study.

    I’m not going to participate, but am going to write them and tell them about TMS and
    TMSWiki.org.

    I doubt they will be interested because it is a Mindbody philosophy, but want them to know there is an alternative to healing from pain when walking.

    I think more of us who believe in Dr. Sarno should contact people conducting such studies, so we spread that word about TMS.
     
    Mermaid and yb44 like this.
  2. Forest

    Forest Beloved Grand Eagle

    That's great, Walt. The more people who know, the better.
     
  3. BruceMC

    BruceMC Beloved Grand Eagle

    Sure sounds like the same mild oxygen deprivation that Dr. Sarno said caused TMS.
     
  4. yb44

    yb44 Beloved Grand Eagle

    Ah ha! I went to my GP last year after deciding to taper off a drug I had been prescribed. I told the GP about a symptom that I was having that I believed to be a side effect of the drug. I had pain in my lower legs whenever I went for a walk. Rather than confirm it may be a side effect, the GP instead suggested that I might be suffering from a certain condition. She referred to it using three initials, very possibly PAD. I didn't ask her to repeat it as I had no intention of rushing home to google it. As soon as I heard the description I was about 98% certain that this was yet another form of TMS. The GP offered to put me through some tests to determine whether I had this condition. I declined. I did eventually taper off the drug I was on and the pain I experienced while walking gradually faded. PAD appears to be yet another example of a condition that professionals and drug companies will jump on and exploit, one that more than likely is mild oxygen deprivation, as Bruce says.
     
  5. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    yb44, you handled all that wisely. I would have done the same.
    Since mild oxygen deprivation can cause pain, as we know from Dr. Sarno,
    deep breathing helps a lot. I really find that even a few minutes of deep breathing calms me.
    I especially practice deep breathing when the postman visits my mailbox and deposits more bills in it.
     
  6. BruceMC

    BruceMC Beloved Grand Eagle

    The proliferation of all these 'conditions', such as PAD, that seem to have no identifiable bacteriological or viral causes makes me highly skeptical about their etiology, diagnosis and treatment. Whenever I hear about these sort of 'conditions' the first thing that comes into my mind is TMS, PPD or Mindbody. You start treating these 'conditions' with medications and the side-effects usually turn out to be worse than the symptoms they're supposed to eliminate. Besides, at best, all you're going to get for the bargain is symptomatic relief that will lead to the symptom substitution via the symptom imperative. Ring around the rosy!
     

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