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Kindling

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by music321, Feb 16, 2017.

  1. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    "Kindling" is a term originally used to describe the progression of epilepsy. It is the phenomenon whereby seizures make the brain more prone to seizures in the future. The term has been borrowed to describe other mal-adaptive "learning" processes. Some have used the term to describe the genesis of "fibromyalgia".

    LINK: http://www.ei-resource.org/news/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-news/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-may-be-explained-by-limbic-kindling/ (Chronic fatigue syndrome may be explained by limbic kindling)

    How do you think the TMS approach relates to this? Do you think that kindling is a real effect, and that a TMS program helps the brain bypass the sensitized regions?
     
  2. plum

    plum Beloved Grand Eagle

    This is very interesting, thanks for the link. I've read through a handful of journal articles and it strikes me that this is a case of different fingers pointing at the same moon. By this I mean scientists are finally beginning to realise that the nervous system is the missing link.

    I'm sure the maladaptive learning relates and is evident in TMS terms of conditioning and triggers. I would suggest that rather than bypassing sensitised regions of the brain TMS healing calms them back down. David Hanscom writes about this aspect and believes it is a crucial first step in recovery. I agree completely.

    I think neuroscience will increasingly validate what Sarno described as 'the black box'. He knew the psychological landscape but couldn't *prove* it in vitro.

    Day after day the good souls here offer abundant in vivo examples and Dr. Schu does publish in peer-reviewed literature so the good fight is been fought.
     
    MindBodyPT likes this.

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