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Derek S. Identifying and overcoming pelvic pain

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Guest, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I've have had severe urethral pain for 28 months. Nothing had been found bacterially or structurally with penis or urinary tract. Can this be TMS? have trouble getting my head around the possibility given proximity to oral sex being performed on me by a stranger but drs insist pain is unrelated to that event. Feedback would be appreciated.
     
  2. Derek Sapico MFT

    Derek Sapico MFT TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for your question.

    Urethral pain can absolutely be TMS, especially considering that you had sexual contact with a stranger prior to the onset of the symptom.

    TMS often will piggyback on an event that causes uncertainty. In this case, there may have been a fear that you had contracted an STD and, boom, symptoms consistent with that very issue appear. It is similar to getting into a minor car accident and developing back or neck pain even if there was no structural or tissue damage.

    By the time that all structural and bacterial causes are ruled out, it has already taken on a life of its own and the symptoms and fear get caught in a self-perpetuating cycle.

    Work toward finding more confidence and assertiveness approaching this from a TMS perspective. This can make a huge difference in the arc of your recovery.


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    Tennis Tom likes this.
  3. Marytabby

    Marytabby Peer Supporter

    I will chime in with a resounding YES. I have bouts of pelvic/bladder inflammation when I am sexually active with a new person. Especially if it's a new or rocky relationship. When I feel vulnerable with a partner I get symptoms.
     
  4. Tennis Tom

    Tennis Tom Beloved Grand Eagle

    Very well said Derek! TMS in a nutshell.

    Cheers,
    tt
     

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