1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Our TMS drop-in chat is tomorrow (Saturday) from 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM Eastern (now US Daylight Time) . It's a great way to get quick and interactive peer support, with MatthewNJ as your host. Look for the red Chat flag on top of the menu bar!

how to make it sink in?

Discussion in 'Support Subforum' started by eskimoeskimo, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    I know that it makes no sense, and is counterproductive, to focus on posture the way I do. I'm still, after all this time working with TMS, preoccupied with 'damage.' I'm always worried that I'm causing some, by sitting or standing in the wrong way or for too long. I've talked about this a lot on here. I've read articles debunking posture, etc etc. But still, I ruminate and doubt. So I guess my question is... does any one have any tips for getting something to sink in? I don't even know how to make sense of the doubt anymore. The amount of times I've written out my little affirmations is dizzying.
     
  2. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    This is just me trying to convince myself but, c'mon! : I'm 26, athletic. I haven't had any major injury. My MRIs don't show anything unusual. And yet I'm worried that my spine is crumbling from sitting too much? It's bullshit! But, I don't feel that. I understand that, but it doesn't sink in.
     
  3. MrRage

    MrRage Peer Supporter

    What do you mean by 'damage'? What are some structural examples you would consider to be 'damage'? What is the mechanism by which this 'damage' will cause pain?
     
  4. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member


    I really don't know. I guess I think most about 'degeneration.' There was one doc who mentioned that I've got some, at some levels maybe even DDD. So I worry about the effects of gravity, shrinking discs etc. Or maybe some combination of bad posture and degeneration leading to some herniations. Something like that.
     
  5. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    I know it doesn't make sense because I still feel guilty, like I've done some damage, even when I've used 'good' posture... which I usually do. There's really no way I could stand or sit without worrying about damage because the pain always makes it feel like it's doing harm. Sitting and standing cause pain for me either way.
     
  6. MrRage

    MrRage Peer Supporter

    Why do you feel guilty about your posture? What do you define as 'good' posture? What is the mechanism by which 'bad' posture' causes back pain

    Do you have any other symptoms besides your back pain?

    Have you tried journaling about your emotions at all?
     
  7. MrRage

    MrRage Peer Supporter

    As for how to 'let it sink in', I had to read and re-read Sarno's books. Steve O's book "The Great Pain Deception" was also very helpful.
     
  8. pspa

    pspa Well known member

    Have you read the studies showing lack of correlation between common spinal "abnormalities" and pain?
     
  9. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hi. Eskimo. I think it would help you to look at the free video on Youtube called Detachment from Over-Thinking. It has good advice on how to stop ruminating. I doubt your posture is causing you pain. Now that notion is in your mind, it's hard to get out because it may have become a conditioned reflect to sitting or standing.

    I think it's bad to be doing Doctor Google searches for spinal abnormalities and pain. Just believe 100 percent that your symptoms are caused by your emotions.
     
    donavanf likes this.
  10. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    Yes, and that helps -- but it doesn't sink in. I still have doubts. For example, those are only a few studies out of many. And I'm worried that it's my desperation that's pushing me to stick with TMS.
     
  11. pspa

    pspa Well known member

    OCD is tough, believe me I get it. Knowing and believing are different things, aren't they?
     
    Shells likes this.
  12. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    Amen.
     
  13. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    It doesn't even make sense. Why would sitting cause neck pain?
     
  14. pspa

    pspa Well known member

    It wouldn't. But muscle tension generated by fear anxiety stress obsessive focus what have you would, and does.
     
    donavanf and eskimoeskimo like this.
  15. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    I feel like I know that's the case, until treating it that way doesn't change anything. On paper, it's obvious what's going on. But in practice ...
     
  16. pspa

    pspa Well known member

    OCD is a disorder of doubt.
     
    eskimoeskimo likes this.
  17. eskimoeskimo

    eskimoeskimo Well known member

    So what to do ? As the symptoms come up, which they do all day every day .... what to do?
     
  18. Steve J.

    Steve J. Well known member

    The answer is so simple, yet feels close to impossible: you live your life. How can we possibly do that when the pain is incessant? Laugh. Be with others. Read powerful books. I know you have been at this for a long time, eskimo. This is the hardest thing we will likely do in our lives. But trying to obsess on progress or lack thereof will make the whole thing that much more difficult.
     
    eljs79 likes this.
  19. MrRage

    MrRage Peer Supporter

    Lose the fear and you'll eventually lose the pain. It just takes time for everything to sink in.
     
    eskimoeskimo and Steve J. like this.
  20. donavanf

    donavanf Well known member

    I have a LOT of OCD tendencies and it has been a major roadblock in my healing. Just know that you are doing it. In some meditation practices, you are taught to just say "ruminating" or "overthinking" to yourself as you catch yourself doing it and then move on. TMS is a call to be present and to feel our feelings. I too, was OBSESSED with posture for many months, if not years, and it made my TMS much worse, never better. The one exception was learning some Alexander Technique, which encourages calm and poised posture, without force or fear. There are many good videos on YouTube. Just don't worry too much about your posture. Worrying and obsessing about posture is a form of self-control that makes the ID very angry indeed. Watch how children walk and posture themselves, or animals, they do it without thinking. Follow suit. Think less, fear less, feel more, emote more and your TMS will get better. You will heal. The body is always healing, all we have to do is trust.
     
    Shells, Steve J., Ellen and 1 other person like this.

Share This Page