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Hip pain

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Annifred, Jul 4, 2019.

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  1. Annifred

    Annifred New Member

    I was diagnosed with bursitis in my hip 16 long months ago! About two months ago I pulled out my Sarno books and re-read his books along with books by Steve Ozanich and Marc Sopher. I'm convinced that my pain is due to TMS. I feel pain if I try to sit cross legged on the floor, but I avoid sitting that way to avoid the discomfort and pain. Otherwise I don't feel much pain during the day, just minor achiness/crankiness. My biggest problem is that most of my pain happens during the middle of the night. My pattern is that I wake up briefly when I hurt and then I change positions. This happens multiple times each night.

    What's the best way to tell my pain to go away when I don't feel it much during the day? So far, I've been unsuccessfully reminding myself that my pain is caused by psychological issues, not physical problems. I'm on the last week of doing the TMS educational program and I've also been doing Dr. Scott Brady's Pain Free for Life daily program for a week or so, but nothing has changed with the way my cranky, sore hip feels.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated! Thank you!
     
    birdsetfree likes this.
  2. limitless

    limitless Newcomer

    If it doesn't go away it wants you to take it more serious. We often think it can be done with little effort. Sometimes it takes a lot to only start to feel a little bit better.
    I would do writing. If we ignore it it will build up. I was pain free but ignored to continue working on it and it hit me back much harder.

    There is another interesting thing that the hips/psoas are connecting the spine with our femur bones. The diaphragm controls breath and is a reactive emotional center. The psoas is attached to it. They provide anterior stability to your spine with each breath. They react to fear and stress with constriction.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  3. birdsetfree

    birdsetfree Well known member

    Find a way to be committed to believing in the psychological cause for your symptoms. Your TMS brain will have you entertaining doubt at every turn. When we can shut the door on that doubt and make the decision to keep believing, things start to happen. You can do that during the day and take the pressure off at night. Just go to bed. Turnover if you want to. It doesn't matter. Just keep working on your belief by building evidence of the true cause of the pain and then it will fade away. Also start sitting cross legged. You can do it gradually if you want. It is important to overcome any fear you have around this. Good luck!
     

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