1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice

Alan G. General help for TMS symptoms

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by bnunofield, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. bnunofield

    bnunofield New Member

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    I sure could use some help. I see a therapist, she isn't aware of the TMS theory. I am being treated for anxiety, depression. Rheumatoid arthritis. It sucks. The culprit to all my ailments was sexual abuse until I was 8 by my oldest brother. I have had bouts with depression and many different sicknesses all my life. I want to live a good quality of life. I don't want this back pain, neck spasms throughout my back hands limbs legs feet to take my joy away. I listened to Dr. Sarno's healing back pain. Just getting started. I could use some help and support. I have a great faith in God. I just need guidance from a professional.
     
  2. Alan Gordon LCSW

    Alan Gordon LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    I'm sorry to hear about everything you've gone through. TMS, anxiety, and depression are common in people who have suffered from trauma, but it is definitely possible to overcome them. You didn't really ask a specific question, so I'll try to answer generally what I think would be important for you to incorporate.

    One of the first and most important components to overcoming TMS is changing your relationship with the pain. Oftentimes people with TMS become obsessed and preoccupied with their symptoms. It is important to recognize that this preoccupation with the pain actually serves to reinforce the symptoms.

    It is also important to alter your relationship with fear. The purpose of the pain is to scare you. So, it is important to challenge the fear associated with your symptoms; empower yourself. Beyond this, we want to help you get beneath the symptoms. Experiencing a trauma can elicit powerful emotions. One of the things you can work on with your therapist is processing these emotions. It is important to explore the possible rage associated with the sexual abuse you experienced as well as some other emotions it may have left you with (guilt, shame, etc.).

    It is also important to explore your relationship with your self. What is your self esteem like? How do you feel about yourself? Do you love yourself or hate yourself? Do you praise or criticize yourself? TMS is often the body's way of rebelling from the way we treat ourselves. We all need to treat ourselves nicely as it is a great way to appease our bodies. One of the most important things I can tell you is to practice soothing yourself. Time does not exist in our primitive brain, so when we experience a trauma, our primitive brain could get stuck in that flight or fight state. Learning to soothe yourself, comfort that part of your brain that is like a scared child can help teach your body that you are no longer in danger. You are safe. You are safe now.

    The following TMS Recovery Program expands on this a lot more and it might benefit you to go through it, read the articles, and listen to the sessions.
    http://www.tmswiki.org/ppd/TMS_Recovery_Program

    Take care,
    Alan


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
    Anne Walker and nowtimecoach like this.
  3. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hi, Alan. I had a roommate a long time ago who kept writing his name. I never understood why, except
    now I wonder if he was trying to figure out who he was. Sometimes he would say that funny old line,
    "I like myself, I think I'm grand. When I go to the show, I hold my hand."

    I lost track of him so I don't know what ever became of him.

    We do have to at least like ourselves.
     
    Anne Walker likes this.

Share This Page