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Daniel L. Flat feet in child

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by CMA, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. CMA

    CMA Peer Supporter

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    Question
    TMS in kids
    So my 11 yr old daughter started having foot pain as she started running past 2 months. She didn't run prior to that. We took her to a Podiatrist who said she has really bad flat feet and she walks like a duck. Her PCP confirmed that her feet are indeed over pronated. The Podiatrist recommended inserts ofcourse. Now when she came home I lectured her as I have myself recovered from TMS (was unable to walk more than 0.25 miles) and now run a couple of miles few times a week. I do have inserts.
    But she does have foot pain after she walks more than 0.5 miles. What do I do should I get her the inserts and then make her walk/run? Please help. Thank you
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2015
  2. Daniel G Lyman LCSW

    Daniel G Lyman LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    I’m a little worried reading your question. You talk about lecturing your daughter and making her run go for a run. If she’s experiencing pain, whether it be TMS or not, lecturing her will not help. Encouraging her to feel safe and listened-to will help.

    I’m glad to hear that you’ve recovered from TMS. However, those of us that have recovered can fall into the trap of thinking that everything is TMS. I’m not confident whether your daughter is dealing with TMS or not (I need a bit more information), but regardless, the pain she’s in is real. Remind yourself of that. And the only way that she can coach herself beyond the pain is to feel safe and not get scared. It’s imperative that she feels your support throughout this process.

    Does she want to get the inserts? If she feels as though it’ll help her, then I’d encourage you to get the inserts. You don’t want your daughter to think that you’re just trying to ‘toughen her up.’ If she needs the inserts for a little while, that’s fine. Don’t think it’ s a horrible thing if she needs inserts in her shoes – it’s not. The key is to not make a big deal out of it. She’s still growing, so she may not feel like she needs the inserts in the near future.

    Again, the most important thing is that you are supportive of her. She needs to feel safe.


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