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Does dreams show my unconscious?

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Seraphina, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. Seraphina

    Seraphina Peer Supporter

    I usually dream a lot. like A LOT. very often. even while I'm taking a 10-minute nap or short doze-off while sitting in a subway. I usually didn't care most of the dreams I had--b/c the content itself was just too unreal or the dream didn't affect me at all when I wake up whatever the content was.

    However, recently, while I'm having physical injuries (gradually recovering...) along with some TMS symptoms, I often wake up with palpitating heart, apprehension, and anxiety that continues from the dream overnight. I feel like something is undone or incomplete (the content of the dream is somewhat relevant most of the time). I really hate that feeling. It feels exactly like when I drink too much coffee: extremely anxious without any reason. And once I notice I'm back to reality and everything was just a dream, the anxiety fades away.

    I came to think maybe the unconscious fear and anxiety I have toward my injuries and their recovery speed (e.g., why does this still hurt? omg now this part aches? Will I be able to fully recover in the end?) show up in my recent dreams...? How do you guys think? How can I deal with my such unconscious...? It definitely feeds TMS, and I can feel it also adds more pain on the physical injuries, too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2014
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  2. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    I have these same type of dreams and I'm recovered from Tms, so I wouldnt say the dreams are part of your conscious fear, then again only a psychoanalyst could say for sure but still I have those type of dreams at least once a week now and I pay them no attention after I awake. I know soon they will stop cause I am not going to feed them any of my focus.
    Bless you
     
  3. Ollin

    Ollin Peer Supporter

    The first thing I would ask is are you on any medication? A lot of drugs prescribed for pain do have side effects showing as sleep disturbances.

    On the other hand, the dreams might be a way of discharging your subconscious tension. The obvious thing is that you are concerned about recovering from your injuries without them being hijacked by TMS. It's a perfectly normal concern, but while it can be rationalized and pushed aside during the day, at night things often seem darker and out of proportion.

    I'm not good at interpreting dreams, but all I know is they can be both random (triggered by a memory of something insignificant) and symbolic. In either case, they are very person-specific, so if you want to find meaning you have to really get in touch with the language of your subconscious (inner-child). If it's a too challenging territory, I would recommend some calming techniques which work for you. Near-sleep states (alpha brainwaves just before and upon awakening) are always best to reach your subconscious. You can repeat some reassuring mantra or affirmation that it's only a dream needed to purge something from your mind. I also recommed EFT tapping, I find that just tapping the points without saying anything (which is all I can do when tired at night) works wonders to put me back into peaceful sleep.
     
    Ellen likes this.
  4. tarala

    tarala Well known member

    Hi Seraphina, you could try reducing resistance to whatever your dreams are trying to tell you, by greater allowance of the feeling just after you wake. So rather than analyzing the dream, or trying to quickly get back to "reality," you might try just sitting with the experience of the feeling for a few minutes. Feel it physically, without trying to stop, fix, or understand it. It seems a little scary or uncomfortable at first, but in truth you'll quickly find that nothing bad happens, and allowance and lack of resistance open the door to insight and understanding that come from a much deeper level than thinking about what's going on.
     
    Ellen likes this.
  5. Dieuke

    Dieuke New Member

    Eric, you offered your help to me some time ago. I would really, really want that help. I did sent you an inbox message, could you have a look at it? thanks, Dieuke
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  6. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    I like Ellen's suggestion of tapping to relax the mind so you can get to sleep.
    Along with deep breathing, it can be very soothing and helpful.
     

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