1. Alan has completed the new Pain Recovery Program. To read or share it, use this link: http://go.tmswiki.org/newprogram
    Dismiss Notice

Do you pop your back and feel better?

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Buckyblue, Aug 15, 2021.

  1. Buckyblue

    Buckyblue New Member

    I am struggling to fully buy in to some of my back/shoulder blade pain being tms because when I put pressure on it, as you would for a knotted muscle, and pop my back I get some relief for a little while. How does this play into mild oxygen deprivation?

    I should be clear that I do have tms but this symptom I am struggling to make fit the diagnosis.
     
  2. Baseball65

    Baseball65 Beloved Grand Eagle

    Sarno addressed this in "Healing Back Pain"... when your back is "popped" or any time other joints make the same noise it is like cracking your knuckles. If you feel better it is because of the Placebo...we think that something is freer, or less compressed, but that is not true. Even the minor weights used in traction don't have the force to adjust anything, as they would need to be in the hundreds of pounds, not 10's. of pounds.

    Funny... half of the people on this board think that a 'popping' is sinister, the other half think it's an adjustment, It is a great exercise in the Placebo vs. Nocebo.

    I used to think the adjustment from my Chiro made me feel better. After studying TMS I realized it was my Chiropractor Himself who made me feel better. Nice guy, great personality, good counselour. Tell's me I am going to feel better and ...Blam. I feel better. Same for back braces, 'lifting correctly' and anything else that focus's on the physical. All placebo's.
     
    Buckyblue likes this.
  3. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    It just releases tension there
     
    Buckyblue likes this.
  4. Ellen

    Ellen Beloved Grand Eagle

    When I was in the midst of pain from fibromyalgia (TMS), I found that cranial-sacral therapy relieved my pain and this relief lasted a few days. The pain would always return, so it was not a cure. I don't know why it helped. Probably due to the care and attention of the practitioner. TMS therapy did work to give permanent relief, though with an occasional relapse.

    It is my understanding that the oxygen deprivation concept was just a theory Sarno had, and that it has been overridden by new findings in neuroscience regarding neural pathways. However, that is still looking at a physical cause. In my experience it is better to focus on the psychological causes and address those.
     
    Buckyblue and Balsa11 like this.

Share This Page