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Crazy tennis elbow..

Discussion in 'Support Subforum' started by E. Lynn, Mar 1, 2015.

  1. E. Lynn

    E. Lynn Peer Supporter

    About two months ago a was kicked in my right forearm(an accident of course). It bruised and formed a knot that took about a month to heal. The location was about two inches down from my elbow. Now, of all things, my brain has decided it to turn it into a case of tennis elbow! At least I think that's what it is. I've never had tennis elbow before, but it aches in that area and in my upper forearm.
    Not only that, my brain has started subconciously holding tension in that forearm and the tension has even moved to encompass my left forearm(though it's not as bad as the right.) When my right elbow and forearm ache, I KNOW it is TMS and I TRY not to focus on it. Even so, it shows no signs of going away. I don't let it stop me from doing any movement. It is annoying though, because I'll be reading or typing and I can feel all this tension in both forearms and can't seem to get rid of it. This is an area I've never had pain in before.
    I've managed to heal some back pain and other pains, but this seems to be stuck. I think it would feel a lot worse if I didn't know it was TMS, but since I do, it only gives me a dull ache. Why does it keep hanging around even though I know it's TMS?
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  2. Andy Bayliss

    Andy Bayliss TMS Coach & Beloved Grand Eagle

    No ideas except keep working diligently to put it into the Sarno box, like you have your other pain. You might look carefully at how you treat it and respond to it in a subtly different way compared to your successfully cured pain. Maybe the injury history gives your mind something legit to hang onto, semi-consciously? I have an elbow and shoulder that twinge, and I am curious the same way. I need to look more closely, and perhaps feel more closely. Luckily I don't think about it unless it happens. What I don't want to do is make it a big project to "cure it perfectly!"
    Andy B.
     
    E. Lynn likes this.
  3. Birdie

    Birdie Peer Supporter

    Oh my....the elbow-thing. After a minor "overuse" I came down with severe pain in my right elbow on the outside (the classic "tennis elbow"). But not enough...after a few weeks the pain shifted to the inner side of the elbow. I now was the prod owner of both, a tennis and a golfers elbow, haha. Of course my left arm begun to hurt, too. All signs of TMS, but it all started before I knew about this tricky condition so I fully bought into it and had a hard time. After my arm pain slowly subsided I developped sitting pain in my sitting bones and, on top of that, insomnia & exhaustion. My sitting and my arm pain have gone, the insomnia still remains.
    So keep on going. The pain shifting to the left side is a clear proof of TMS, in my eyes...
     
    E. Lynn likes this.
  4. sam908

    sam908 Peer Supporter

    In 1995, I had surgery for Golfer's Elbow. Had I known about TMS and applied Dr. Sarno's concepts, I probably wouldn't have needed the surgery. Live and learn.
     
  5. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Amazing what our minds can do to us.
    I didn't have any knee pain until about two weeks ago when several people posted they had it.
    I'm telling myself it's TMS and it's slowly feeling better.
     
  6. E. Lynn

    E. Lynn Peer Supporter

    Isn't that the truth, Walt. I never knew how complicated the mind was until starting working on TMS. It's like my mind HAS to have somewhere to put tension. I've gotten way better about holding it in my back and now this.
     

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