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Chicken or egg question

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by dharn999, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. dharn999

    dharn999 Peer Supporter

    this go around with TMS this time has me thinking too much and while in pretty sure I already know the answer I would like some input from what others have noticed or believe

    I've been reading a lot about mindfulness and being in the moment instead of dwelling on the past or looking to the future because these kind of thoughts feed our symptoms sometimes. (And I've been struggling with this lately and I can tell it that it's enhanced my symptoms when I do, guess that's a good observation/sign I'm dealing with TMS)

    So my question is, does mindfulness make our symptoms fade away, or do we become more mindful when our symptoms fade after accepting the diagnosis (struggling with that still even though My symptoms faded down 90% for 2 years before this current relapse)

    Let me know what you all think.. If I remember correctly the first time I just kept ignoring the symptoms and telling myself it was TMS.. Then I slowly felt better and mindfulness started and my focus went away from physical and back to my life
     
  2. birdsetfree

    birdsetfree Well known member

    I would say mindfulness is a choice, not a result. It is one of my main tools for recovery, together with acceptance and waiting for time to pass.
     
    Ellen likes this.
  3. Ftaghn!

    Ftaghn! Peer Supporter

    That was also my experience whenever I had a TMS issue in the past. Before I had TMS, I remember I used to have heavy back pain for 3 months or so. Then at one point, I read that back pain rarely lasts longer than that, so I started relaxing, and it disappeared entirely. I had a few of those before I really stuck on a set of symptoms that caught my attention.

    So I think mindfulness comes first, but in my experience, it's easier to be tricked into it than to force it. It's hard to keep the mind from wandering.
     
  4. kersm

    kersm New Member

    Mindfulness as a choice comes first, but then they go hand in hand I believe.
     
  5. birdsetfree

    birdsetfree Well known member

    Actually I think I disagree with myself. Living authentically in my reconsidered opinion can perhaps result in living mindfully. As we act purposefully on being real there is nothing to ruminate on leaving us free to enjoy the moment.
     

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