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"Change your mind and lose your Pain”

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Eric "Herbie" Watson, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    "Change your mind and lose your Pain”

    Your Thoughts Create Your Emotions, Emotions create pain. Discharge the negative Emotion and loose the pain

    In visualization, your thoughts are used to create an image in your mind’s eye, imagining it unfolding in real time. Depending on the thoughts, an emotional response is created in your body in real time. Your subconscious mind does not know the difference between a real experience or an imagined experience. Your body still responds to the thoughts and images that are being created in your mind.
    IF we can discharge a memory or take the negative charge out of an emotion in an instant and we can with the nlp swish. Then couldn’t we lose pain and anxiety too since they are merely emotions created by thought – Yes.
    Can we get a person to go from mad or fearful to not being mad or fearful in seconds? Then it would only be logic if a person holds a thought they don’t like – then they will feel pain from it right, whether consciously or un-consciously.
    I mean we usually look for repressed emotions and current pressures to help us feel better, Sarno’s style right. It’s still memories and thoughts that are creating those emotions whether consciously or unconsciously -- that’s why when we instantly change a memory with a swish we get the reconsolidation of that swish which is when the pain lessons somewhat to a degree and often to huge degrees
    And anxiety can be lost to in an instant. When the anxiety or pain is lost we call this the reconsolidation process.
    Reconsolidation can be achieved through the swish and many other ways – here we will show the swish picture pattern which can be gained through these steps.
    1)- Think of a picture or feeling or sound that makes you feel bad or you don’t like or it gives you just bad –negative thoughts, then when you feel the emotion very strongly -- stop thinking of the bad memory for about 5 or 10 seconds. Think of something else like your breathing for a bit -- this is called breaking state. Reminder note -- Think of the pictures you see as mirrors, flat like and this will make them easier to move around ok.
    2) - Next think of the best memory you have ever had, something that makes you feel great or accomplished in life – complete. Think of this memory now, see what you saw hear what you heard and feel what you felt.
    3) - Then as you get to feeling at your super best -- stop thinking of the good memory for about 5 or 10 seconds and break state again. Think of something else like your breathing.
    4) - Next go back to the original memory that made you feel bad and as you think of what the memory looks like and feels like imagine the good memory move in behind the negative memory in your imagination or your mind’s eye. Yes -- move the pictures you see in your imagination.
    5) - Remember to think of the pictures you see as mirrors or flat walls or something like a TV screen. That’s the way you see things in your mind any how -- this will make them easier to move around and manipulate.
    6) - When you do this process and you look at the negative picture after moving the positive picture behind it -- then you will see the positive picture bleed through --
    7) - The swish will happen when you see the positive picture coming through the negative picture and at this time the negative picture will not be negatively charged to you anymore it won’t have any bad feelings associated to it and the reconsolidation process will have took place leaving you with no fear or anger thus no pain or anxiety – yes your pain or anxiety will be gone if you do these steps correctly. Remember you have to make all this happen in a process in your thoughts – it doesn’t just happen, you make it happen with effort of the process then you will get the result.

    Repeat several times if needed

    This reconsolidation process has been used in emdr and many other therapies in their own right. I want to show below the research that I accumulated from DR. alexander's web-site to show its authenticity. I bolded the names NLP, EMDR and EFT so you can know the facts about these power therapies --

    Any attempt to explain EMDR from a neuroscience perspective must now take into account the role which memory reconsolidation plays. Memory consolidation is the process that the brain undertakes in order to convert short term ‘working’ memories into long term memories. Carter (2010) states that the initial memory consolidation process can take as long as three years. This explains the gradual process of a memory coming in and out of our awareness, and over time losing some of its emotional charge. Where the experience is a highly emotionally stressful one (the type typically referred to as traumatic), this consolidation process can occur very quickly (Panksepp & Biven 2012). The brain is especially geared towards remembering events and information which are essential for survival, such that the details of a dangerous or traumatic situation are likely to be well consolidated in a rapid manner. The experiential components relating to a traumatic or dangerous event are important pieces of information which the brain will latch on to in order that the chances of surviving similar experiences in the future are enhanced. As such, traumatic memories can be stored in rich detail with the full emotional charge, as seen with PTSD.
    In contrast to traumatic experiences, the more gradual consolidation process with non-traumatic events occurs over time and involves our mind/brain sifting through experiences in order to work out what to do with the more short term working memory. Do the contents need to be discarded as unimportant, not serving our emotional needs, etc; or stored away as important information? The obvious comparison with the 'defragging' process of computers is often used to describe this aspect of consolidation.
    The assumption in neuroscience (until around 2004) was that such emotional memories, particularly of distressing event, are indelible- that is, that they can’t be erased. Research evidence, from studies with both animals and humans, now makes it clear that these powerfully learnt emotional responses can indeed be erased, via processes which are referred to as reconsolidation (Ecker et al 2012). What is being erased is not the auto-biographical memory, in that people still remember what they have experienced when the emotional component of the memory has been targeted for change. However, when reconsolidation has occurred, the emotional charge of the upsetting memory has been erased.
    Neuroscientists have established the necessary conditions for reconsolidation to occur- these can be, and often are replicated in particular types of psychotherapy. Ecker et al (2012) state that psychotherapies can be roughly divided between those that are counteractive and those that are transformative. Counteractive therapies attempt to control and counteract the symptoms with a range of strategies. These are reliant upon the neocortex attempting to control the lower-down emotional centres of the brain, such as the limbic system and the midbrain PAG. The classic example of counteractive therapies is CBT, but there are many others, such as mindfulness and related approaches like Acceptance & Commitment Therapy, etc. If people stick to only counteractive psychological approaches, the best they can hope for is to have the limbic and PAG arousal (ie. emotional distress) contained. Such approaches can provide the person with a new emotional learning, which then competes with the existing neurological pathway of established distress. There is no guarantee that the new emotional learning will succeed in over-powering the traumatic learning, and the latter can often be easily triggered by environmental or cognitive cues.
    Transformative psychotherapies, on the other hand, work in reverse, ie. creating changes in the deeper emotional centres of the brain, which then flow changes on to the higher thinking centres. It is likely that there have always been psychotherapeutic processes which harnessed this capacity for reconsolidation, long before neuroscientists were aware of either the term or the process. In fact, the most effective psychotherapies have managed to launch reconsolidation processes without any awareness that this is what happens. And some distinctly non-reconsolidation therapies have also occasionally achieved this outcome by accident. Examples of transformative therapies given by Ecker et al (2012) are their own approach, Coherence Therapy, as well as EMDR, Gestalt therapy, Hakomi and other body therapies; NLP, Emotion Focused Therapy, Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Therapy, Interpersonal Neurobiology, Focusing, inner child work, Jungian active imagination, guided imagery, and Emotional Freedom Techniques (not an exhaustive list). It is apparent that reconsolidation can also occur spontaneously in a non-therapy context when the right conditions happen to be in place. Accounts of people experiencing a sudden and powerful shift from a distressed to non-distressed state are examples of this phenomenon. The common feature of reconsolidation experiences, achieved either through transformative or counteractive therapies, or through spontaneous non-therapy experiences is that once the shift has occurred, there is no further need to be working against the distress. It simply ceases to exist.
    Transformative psychotherapeutic approaches are the most likely ones to achieve this outcome. When they have been effective, there is no need to counteract the distressing emotions or material, as this has been erased via changes in neural pathways at the synaptic level (Ecker et al 2012). The neural pathways associated with the old emotional learning, eg. fear of loud bangs, have been altered in terms of synapses disconnecting from the established fear pathway. The affective experience of fear has been transformed by a reconsolidation process so that there is simply no more distress there that needs to be controlled or managed, thought away or ignored. This sounds fantastic, but Ecker et al (2012) have detailed how transformative psychotherapies actually replicate the same reconsolidation conditions in the therapy which neuroscientists have elucidated in the laboratory. When this reconsolidation occurs, the seemingly intractable emotional distress from past experiences ceases to exist. The neural pathway itself has been altered, rather than being in competition with a new pathway. People still have the episode in their biographical memory, but it no longer elicits distress. This type of outcome is regularly seen with the use of EMDR. A memory which 30 minutes earlier could cause a panic attack, after effective EMDR, is experienced as merely another episode in one’s life, without the autonomic arousal or negative views of the self.
    The conditions required for such transformative memory reconsolidation, both in the laboratory as well as in therapy, entail firstly the reactivation of the distressing emotions associated with the target memory. In a therapeutic context, this involves the trauma sufferer being brought in contact with the experience in an emotionally evocative and vivid manner. Ecker et al (2012) describe how traumatic events result in ‘emotional learnings’, or cognitive schemas which entail notions of causality and responsibility, expectations of future events, as well as associated physiological sensations. As an example, a child who experiences violence from a parent may ‘learn’ from the situation that they are unovable, that other people are unpredictable, and that the world is essentially a dangerous place. Getting in touch with this emotional learning is likely to trigger autonomic arousal, which is the first step in reconsolidation.
    Ecker et al (2012) have provided a thorough examination of an EMDR case, analysed from a reconsolidation perspective. It is clear from their analysis that EMDR sessions operate in a non-linear manner, with the different steps involved in reconsolidation being used back and forth throughout the session. With that reality in mind, the bi-lateral stimulation phase of the EMDR process is preceded by having the client get in touch with the experience imaginally. As part of the preparation phase, the client will be asked a range of questions which are designed to vividly reactivate the affective experience. Specifically, they are asked to create a visual picture of the distressing event; what negative thoughts or beliefs about themselves arise when in touch with that image (eg. themes of responsibility, personal failing, and/or lack of safety or control); what emotions are triggered when in touch with the image and the negative cognition; the strength of these emotions on a SUDS measure; and where they feel this distress in their body. As such, the person is brought in contact with the visual, affective, cognitive, and physiological components of the distressing event. Typically, this involves a reactivation of the distress associated with the event.
    The second requirement of the reconsolidation process is the activation of an experience or information which disconfirms the phenomenological experience of the original distressing event via a ‘mismatch’. The new perception or experience needs to differ from the target memory in terms of its salient novelty or simple contradiction, as it is the violation of expectations from prior learning which launches the reconsolidation process. Such a mismatch, or violation of expectations can be in terms of qualitative differences, whereby the presumed outcome does not occur at all; or it can be in terms of quantitative differences, whereby the outcome is of a different magnitude to what is predicted.
    During the bi-lateral stimulation phase, around fifty percent of clients of EMDR clients will experience a spontaneous ‘arising’ of cognitive/emotive material, and/or mental imagery and associated physiological changes, which are discordant with the original target memory. As an example, the person who was subjected to violence as a child may spontaneously experience imagery of themselves as a powerful adult, now able to defend themselves. The cognition, “It’s over and I can defend myself now” may present in their awareness. Other clients may experience the spontaneous arising of imagery which appears completely unrelated to the theme of the target memory. For example, they may experience imagery (and associated cognitions, feelings and bodily sensations) of being on a beautiful beach enjoying the sunshine. Or an image of their favourite tree to climb as a child may arise, along with the associated positive feelings of being safe. Ecker et al (2012 p.145) state, “Phenomenologically it is as though the individual’s inner being possesses a hidden store of intuitive knowledge that has been precisely tapped for a needed unit of illumination. Whatever its actual source, the newly emergent contradictory knowledge had the specificity and compelling realness required for successfully disconfirming and dissolving the target construct ”.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
    nancy likes this.
  2. nancy

    nancy Well known member

    Thank you Erik, you have made my night. You are a very special person and I respect
    you so very much. Thanks for the push, it's what I needed. Fondly, Nancy
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  3. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    Nancy go over the above again and again until you really get it ok. You will notice something very magical happen when its done right.
    Bless You Nancy
     
  4. nancy

    nancy Well known member

    Thank you buddy, my friend, I will follow whatever you suggest to me, I believe in you
    and know that all will be well, Fondly, Nancy
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.

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