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Can plantar fasciitis actually be a structural problem?

Discussion in 'Support Subforum' started by Sparrow, Dec 2, 2020.

  1. Sparrow

    Sparrow Peer Supporter

    I usually feel like if you have to ask if something is TMS, then it probably is. But sometimes it's harder to tell.

    I'm having severe plantar fasciitis in one foot after a moderate run yesterday. Like, I cannot walk whatsoever and the pain woke me up at night. Pretty big bummer.

    I had plantar fasciitis in the past that, once I attributed it to TMS, vanished completely. This time around I wonder if it's different. I do strike differently with that foot because of a different infliction that's fairly recent, so I just wonder if there could actually be a structural/physiological reason for this, and how I can know...
    I feel a bit trapped because I wouldn't trust anything a doctor says, even if they happened to be correct.
     
    Balsa11 likes this.
  2. Andy Bayliss

    Andy Bayliss TMS Coach & Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hi Sparrow,

    I suppose plantar fasciitis might have some actual physical ailment aspects, but I think it is rare. I was diagnosed with it by several docs and it was not true for me.

    I suggest you deeply contemplate these symptoms as TMS. What was coming up for you recently? What events? Stressors? Changes? I would "up my game" in the TMS world for a month or two, and see if it did not resolve. In other words, I would assume it is TMS. If it isn't, that will probably become apparent in time. No harm in treating as TMS.

    Andy
     
    Balsa11 likes this.
  3. Sparrow

    Sparrow Peer Supporter

    I guess my concern is if I treat it as TMS and try to push through pain... what if I actually have a torn ligament that I make worse by instigating it and not letting it heal.
     
    Balsa11 likes this.
  4. Andy Bayliss

    Andy Bayliss TMS Coach & Beloved Grand Eagle

    Hi Sparrow,

    I get your concern. I would not recommend "pushing through pain." I am not an expert on how a torn ligament would heal, but it seems walking/standing for normal activities might not hurt it. Maybe back off running for a couple of weeks, use contrasting hot and cold water treatments, don't obsess about physical treatments, but treat it well. Assume it will bounce back. Very mildly "challenge the pain" in ways which are not injurious.

    Also, keep reassuring yourself that this is TMS in any way which you are drawn to. You're safe, you're well, you're willing to feel emotional stuff which may be hiding...

    And, do daily TMS practices. Put yourself in a program.
    Often the second time around, TMS symptoms are calling you to deeper self-examination. In your mind, this should become a psychological question, not a physical one.

    When I had symptoms (for years) I was afraid anything which caused pain (like standing) was injurious to it. That was a mistake.

    I think the basic assumption is if it is physical it will heal in a couple of months max. So if you don't abuse it, and you're still in pain that far out, it is more evidence of TMS.

    Andy
     
    Balsa11 and Sparrow like this.
  5. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    You would probably feel a torn ligament like a pop and probably would see a doctor. Plantar fascitis is definitely TMS because it cramps and stiffens. Spasms are painful but you could still walk at your own pace or with support.
     
  6. Balsa11

    Balsa11 Well known member

    I realized it's more about not worrying about the pain rather than "pushing through" the pain or forcing.
     
    Sparrow likes this.

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