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Breaking News !!

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Mermaid, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. Mermaid

    Mermaid Well known member

    Hi All

    I live in northern England and I just watched an item on our local TV news about mindfulness meditation and positive affirmations successfully reducing pain in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The research is being carried out at Manchester University.

    Over here there is absolutely zero positive coverage of anything other than allopathic treatments by the media, so while this is a very small step, it is nevertheless a step toward greater understanding of chronic pain.

    One day the tables will turn and a lot of needless suffering will end.
     
    North Star, Lily Rose and Ellen like this.
  2. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    That's great news, Mermaid. The media reporting the study from Manchester University may spread as other TV
    stations pick it up and it appears in newspapers. Mindbody practices like those in TMS healing are getting more attention
    in U.S. media, too. The good news of Dr. Sarno and TMS is spreading.

    Have a great day!
     
    North Star and Mermaid like this.
  3. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    Here is one posted by Ellen in December of last year from Wisconsin that tells of the positive effects meditation has on our body. Awesome


    Study reveals gene expression changes with meditation
    Date:
    December 8, 2013
    Source:
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Summary:
    With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body. A new study reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.

    [​IMG]
    A new study found evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.
    Credit: © Konstantin Yuganov / Fotolia
    [Click to enlarge image]

    With evidence growing that meditation can have beneficial health effects, scientists have sought to understand how these practices physically affect the body.


    A new study by researchers in Wisconsin, Spain, and France reports the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.
    The study investigated the effects of a day of intensive mindfulness practice in a group of experienced meditators, compared to a group of untrained control subjects who engaged in quiet non-meditative activities. After eight hours of mindfulness practice, the meditators showed a range of genetic and molecular differences, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which in turn correlated with faster physical recovery from a stressful situation.
    "To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows rapid alterations in gene expression within subjects associated with mindfulness meditation practice," says study author Richard J. Davidson, founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds and the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    "Most interestingly, the changes were observed in genes that are the current targets of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs," says Perla Kaliman, first author of the article and a researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research of Barcelona, Spain (IIBB-CSIC-IDIBAPS), where the molecular analyses were conducted.
    The study was published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.
    Mindfulness-based trainings have shown beneficial effects on inflammatory disorders in prior clinical studies. The new results provide a possible biological mechanism for therapeutic effects.
    The results show a down-regulation of genes that have been implicated in inflammation. The affected genes include the pro-inflammatory genes RIPK2 and COX2 as well as several histone deacetylase (HDAC) genes, which regulate the activity of other genes epigenetically by removing a type of chemical tag. What's more, the extent to which some of those genes were downregulated was associated with faster cortisol recovery to a social stress test involving an impromptu speech and tasks requiring mental calculations performed in front of an audience and video camera.
    Perhaps surprisingly, the researchers say, there was no difference in the tested genes between the two groups of people at the start of the study. The observed effects were seen only in the meditators following mindfulness practice. In addition, several other DNA-modifying genes showed no differences between groups, suggesting that the mindfulness practice specifically affected certain regulatory pathways.
    However, it is important to note that the study was not designed to distinguish any effects of long-term meditation training from those of a single day of practice. Instead, the key result is that meditators experienced genetic changes following mindfulness practice that were not seen in the non-meditating group after other quiet activities -- an outcome providing proof of principle that mindfulness practice can lead to epigenetic alterations of the genome.
    Previous studies in rodents and in people have shown dynamic epigenetic responses to physical stimuli such as stress, diet, or exercise within just a few hours.
    "Our genes are quite dynamic in their expression and these results suggest that the calmness of our mind can actually have a potential influence on their expression," Davidson says.
    "The regulation of HDACs and inflammatory pathways may represent some of the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic potential of mindfulness-based interventions," Kaliman says. "Our findings set the foundation for future studies to further assess meditation strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions."
    Study funding came from National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (grant number P01-AT004952) and grants from the Fetzer Institute, the John Templeton Foundation, and an anonymous donor to Davidson. The study was conducted at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the UW-Madison Waisman Center.
    Story Source:
    The above story is based on materials provided by University of Wisconsin-Madison. The original article was written by Jill Sakai. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
    braden101 and Mermaid like this.
  4. Richsimm22

    Richsimm22 Well known member

    Where in northern England are you from? Im from Middlesbrough.
     
  5. Mermaid

    Mermaid Well known member

    I live in a little hamlet called Weir on the Lancashire, Yorkshire border. We're not big on alternative therapies "up North" are we :rolleyes:
     
    Richsimm22 likes this.
  6. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    The studies are great to know. Mindfulness meditation. The more we can learn about it and practice it, the
    more peace we will have and the less pain.
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  7. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    Yes Walt this study backs up what has already been said about Mindfulness meditation for thousands of years.
    Now with science proving so much of it true how could we not use it to get better on our journey. I love it.
    Thanks
     
  8. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    I'm going to do more research and reading on Mindfulness Meditation.
    It really is a great technique to practice for inner peace and healing.
     
  9. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    I just read this in Steve Ozanich's book, The Great Pain Deception:

    "Anger can only be transformed through mindfulness. Mindfulness is the practice of being present,
    and aware of what is going on, without any judgment, simply observing what is: Body and mind united.
    By taking care of your anger you transform it from negative to positive energy. Taking care of it means
    to not battle it, but rather, understand why it exists, and then use the energy of anger to transform it into something
    positive or useful."

    It takes practice, but it can help relieve anger and the pain and stress anger causes.
     
    G.R. and Lily Rose like this.
  10. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    Yes if I get angered I come into the now quick and then I will focus on my emotions I feel in my body then I will go into mindfulness meditation and breath. This always helps me get through rough times without having to repress anything.

    My puppies are about two months old today. I gave 1 away about a week ago and was going to put some pictures up on Facebook today to see if anyone local might want a new sweet little puppy. When I got out to feed them two of the puppies were gone and I have my ideas of what happened to them but I'm not going to go into that (family)
    Anyhow to me if someone takes without telling you -- well that's thievery and I was boiling mad.

    I prayed first that God be their shelter and keep them safe where ever they went and then I came in and did exactly what I said above. I had to come right into the now. Then I focused on my emotions for about three minutes and then I did mindfulness meditation. It didn't bring my puppies back but it did cool me down so I could think clearer and feel better without being anxious.

    I know where ever those little puppies are that I haven't got to name yet -- they are doing fine cause I sow good seed and I believe life is good if you can look at it that way. That re-frame in thought while under meditation helped me a lot and that's how I have practiced it for a while now.

    Something like the way Steve Ozanich says in his book.

    Thanks

    Bless you
     
    G.R. and Lily Rose like this.
  11. Lily Rose

    Lily Rose Beloved Grand Eagle

    Yes! Observing. Being a witness to ourselves. Yes yes. This is one of those absolutely perfect passages in his book.

    with grace and gratitude,
    ^_^
     
  12. Lily Rose

    Lily Rose Beloved Grand Eagle

    And here you trip upon one of my triggers .... animals. You handled it far better than I would have. You have my deepest sympathy, Herbie ... I hope you find them. I will look the other way if you pound the culprits a few times .... mm, did I say that? Me? Indeed.

    What breed of dogs? Feel free to post a picture or three for us to ooh and ahh over.

    Much love.

    with grace and gratitude,
    ^_^
     
    G.R. and Eric "Herbie" Watson like this.
  13. nancy

    nancy Well known member

    Erik, I no sooner sent a message to you and then read about your puppies. I am so sorry,
    my heart goes out to you and your family. I pray that you find them and know that the
    Lord will take care of them. Thinking of you, Nancy
     
  14. G.R.

    G.R. Well known member

    Eric, I am so sorry about your puppies. I trust God will lead them home to you and you will be reunited.
    I know that the Lord has His hand upon them. If someone took them I pray that their conscious would
    convict them. Stay strong. You are so loved. G.R.
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  15. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    I too am very sorry someone took your puppies. How can people be so mean?

    God is protecting your puppies.
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  16. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  17. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    Thanks Lily Rose and GR -- Nancy and Walt. You all mean a lot to me, I suppose someone stole the puppies -- since I didn't have them registered there's not much I can do. I will take the advice that they are safe and took care of. I did look for them and I can't find a trace so I really do assume someone took them. Hopefully they will be well taken care of and that's what I'm setting my heart too.

    Again thank you so much for your prayers and concern. I will have some pictures of the other three by Wednesday that I was going to put on my Facebook and Ill also put them here so you all can see my new little friends.

    I can already tell one is the watcher over the other two. He keeps his eye on his little sisters. That's Rocco. The two girls are Sandy and Sasha. They just run around and play with their mother like their a bunch of little cubs. Its healing to watch their natural enthusiasm and when its feeding time I'm Uncle herb as they come running ready to eat and find out what kinds of goodies I have in their Doggie bags. :)

    Bless You
     
  18. North Star

    North Star Beloved Grand Eagle

    Oh Herbie…I am so sorry about your puppies. I am longing for a little four-legged doggy friend so I can only imagine your devastation. We live on a busy highway with no fence so that's why I haven't gotten one yet.

    I hope we get a happy update from you later.
     
    Eric "Herbie" Watson likes this.
  19. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Herbie, maybe think the puppies were not stolen but just wandered away.
    They are finding their own happy lives and they are well.
    They may have found a foster family to join.

    Thinking this way you won't be angry at anyone.
     

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