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Alan G. Acute injuries

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by music321, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. music321

    music321 Peer Supporter

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    Hi. First, thanks for offering this service. I can't afford to visit a TMS therapist.

    There are two issues that I'd like to address.

    I spent 3 years in bed with chronic pain. I started to get out of bed when my Vit D levels were normalized with supplements in 2011. I have been making very slow progress with lots of setbacks since then. I was able walk four miles every other day in July. One day, I walked two miles. Later that same day, I did "calf lifts" on a stair. I lifted and lowered my entire body weight on one leg. I was going to do this until 15 reps, or until fatigue made it impossible. At the top of rep 12, I felt a sharp pain in the region of the tendon/muscle junction of my calf. Thereafter, I had quite a bit of pain throughout my calves, with pain especially problematic where I felt the original pain. The muscle in the area has a "knot". A physiatrist, who actually met DR Sarno at one time, said that I have microtearing. The calves are much better, but this region is still knotted. Furthermore, my calves are very weak from a lack of standing in the 13 weeks since the "injury". I was making fine progress, and only did this much excercise since, after reading Sarno, I thought that if something (in this case, my body weight) wsere too heavy to lift, I simply would not be able to lift it, and would't cause myself harm by pushing to maximum. In running forums and articles, it seems like these sorts of microtears are very common. Is this sort of calf "tearing" real, or do all of these runners have TMS? I want to push myself hard to get my strength back, but I don't want to sit on my butt for an additional 13 weeks.

    Secondly, a few weeks ago, I was in a strange position where I was squatting on one leg tucked under my butt to the point that my heal was touching my butt. I raised myself to standing, and felt pain as I was rising. It was 150 lbs on one leg, a lot of weight. I don't know if this is a real injury either. I am very deconditioned, but am only 38. Is this sort of injury even possible?

    Sorry for the long post. I wanted to ask both questions at once. These answers will really help me. thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 30, 2016
  2. Alan Gordon LCSW

    Alan Gordon LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Regarding your first question, this is the type of question that can only be answered by a tms physician. I really think it's worth consulting with one, even if you have to make a brief trip to see one. They are listed state by state in the practitioner's directory on the tms wiki.


    Regarding your second question, it's possible that this can be a real injury, tms, or a real injury at first and tms is kind of piggy backing on it. Luckily if it's a real injury, muscle, ligament, meniscus, etc. diagnostic tests should be able to pick it up.

    Sorry I can't give you a more concrete answer but the answers are out there, you just have to consult with the physicians who can best make this determination.

    Alan[\aska_a]


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

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