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Alex B. 5 questions

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by riv44, Jul 18, 2015.

  1. riv44

    riv44 Well known member

    This question was submitted via our Ask a TMS Therapist program. To submit your question, click here.

    Question
    1. Is Dr. Ramirez the key Boston specialist in TMS?
    2. Is it important to have a formal diagnosis, or is my sense in the rightness of TMS enough?
    3. Structurally, my scoliosis leans toward the left, and is mild. For three years, my pain has taken turns occupying my right lower lumbar, my right toe, mid back, my right trapezius area, sciatica on the right side, neck pain on the right, right thumb joint. Any significance to right side manifestation of pain?
    4. Isn't lowering anxiety the critical task?
    5. What do you think about the multi-generational transmission of TMS? is it like multi-generational transmission of trauma? I believe can trace TMS back for 3 known familial generations.

    The pain travels- packs up from one area, pitches its tent in the next.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 25, 2015
  2. Alex Bloom LCSW

    Alex Bloom LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Hi Riv, thanks for the question.

    Firstly, I'm not familiar with the Boston area as I am located in Los Angeles, but perhaps someone else on the forums can speak more accurately about Dr. Ramirez. I'll ask around with some of my colleagues.

    I believe that having a formal diagnosis is an important element in treating TMS. Accumulating evidence is key to being able to confront the part of your unconscious mind that will always attribute your symptoms to physical factors. By getting a diagnosis and understanding the details of your symptoms you can begin to confront them from a place of empowerment. Furthermore, it is important to be sure that you are indeed dealing with TMS. If you do have a structural issue then it needs to be treated as such.

    As far as significance to right vs. left I haven't encountered that specifically, but I think this illustrates why it is important to get a diagnosis. While it sounds as though the symptoms are independent of the mild scoliosis, as long as there is ambiguity, the anxiety and fear have a solid base to go back to. By getting clarity on what is a reasonable amount of pain to expect and if your symptoms are inconsistent with that you give yourself the opportunity to reframe the meaning of the pain when it arises. Lowering anxiety is a very important component, and this is what can help you do it.

    We are all influenced by the circumstances of our upbringing and while the factors that cause some to experience TMS while others do not are still not fully understood, long-standing familial patterns of relating to pain and physical awareness are definitely something that can be learned. The underlying causes of people's symptoms are almost always learned behaviors or ways of relating to themselves so it stands to reason that if your family has this established way of relating to pain and anxiety, you could learn it as well.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
  3. Forest

    Forest Beloved Grand Eagle

    Overall, the TMS specialist I hear recommended most frequently is Dr. Eugenio Martinez. A high-posting member of the forum who I know pretty well went to him and says he's terrific.
     
  4. riv44

    riv44 Well known member

    This is not a question; it is a response to you as clinicians.
    I have seen Dr. Martinez and the diagnosis is confirmed. I liked him and would refer people to him. Indeed, I have come a long way.

    I am inquiring my psychotherapy patients about their physical symptoms in a more attentive way, much as I do regarding their substance use. My practice is subtly yet dramatically changing, as I think that there can be recovery for people who are defeated by their DSM diagnoses.

    I have a psychiatrist who prescribes for "OCD" and depression/anxiety and is very experienced, but of course never heard of Sarno. Unfortunately, qualified and experienced M.D.s often can't see the forest for the trees. I understand that my symptoms, i.e. anxiety and insomnia, are also MBS. I feel that I have to teach my treatment providers, which is I suppose OK.

    I am educated and articulate (though also anxious and obsessive) and even so, I am intimidated by the medical profession.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2015

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