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Setback...

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by veronica73, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. veronica73

    veronica73 Well known member

    Hi everyone,

    I had kind of a setback last week after having a GREAT week the week before...

    Last weekend was a rough one for me emotionally due to a discussion that came up with a friend of mine. The work week was also more hectic than usual with a lot of very detail-oriented tasks that I am good at but that are triggering for me. And I've been working on my taxes which has had a similar effect.

    Throughout the week I had a few mild pain episodes and then yesterday I started to have a headache that I am had a hard time getting rid of despite journaling, reminding myself it's TMS, etc. It actually woke me up from sleep which has only happened a few times in the past. I took some Tylenol and it greatly subsided and I went back to sleep.

    I'm feeling discouraged by this, like somehow doing the TMS method wrong to be getting a headache like this after knowing what I know. I even have a diagnosis from a TMS doctor so I really know that is what I have and yet I still had pain.

    I found myself feeling discouraged and wondering if I'll always struggle with this.

    Any insights?

    :( Veronica
     
  2. Beach-Girl

    Beach-Girl Well known member

    Hi Veronica:

    Oh set-backs. Let me count the times. It's "one step forward - steps back". I can't count the set-backs I've had. There have been many. But I'm learning to recognize and acknowledge the progress I've made since starting the program. I've had some great days and think: I'm here! And then something will happen, not enough rest, a conversation like you had - I'm back at what *I* see is square one.

    I hope you are keeping in mind there is no time limit on when the pain will go away. There are triggers along the way that I've learned to take note of, and try and keep going. Sometimes I have a bad week. But I continue to write, talk with trusted friends, and know that one day this will be in my past.

    Remember: you have a healthy body. Perhaps that talk with your friend has triggered something you can't quite put your finger on yet. But I bet if you keep writing - free write quickly - the trigger will come to light. You'll understand what it is. And it might happen again but this time you can self talk your way out of that headache.

    You kind of remind me of myself. I had expected to build "Rome in a day" - but find that when I'm doing something I've always done easily I can be triggered. There are many things I'm learning to let go of, or try to at least.

    Did you take some time outs? This for me is essential. Learning to have "me" time. I am learning a lot about myself and my back pain, but I'm still triggered very easily unless I have plenty of rest and plenty of down time.

    Knowledge is power - but it's not a cure. I'd say with your great weeks you had with no headaches, you should explore in your journal why they were so successful. I think you're doing really well as I've followed your journey from the last forum. I'm finding the subconscious and my back pain are just happy as can be together. They aren't going to give up without a fight. Keep writing. Take some time to do nothing but walk, go to a movie, or simply hang out in your socks all day. We need rest from this work as much as we need to tend to the work.

    You're doing great Veronica - try not to have any expectations and you'll soon recognize the triggers.

    Hope you have no headaches today!!

    BG
     
    JanAtheCPA and Forest like this.
  3. Forest

    Forest Forum Administrator

    Everything that Beach-Girl said was on point. Reading your post reminded me of a couple of things that Alan Gordon mentioned in his Breaking the Pain Cycle article. the first was
    Fear and attention is what can make a little twinge of pain turn into a full fledged relapse. That's why it is so important to investigate our emotions when we our symptoms start to act up. By changing our focus on what emotional issues we have going on, we will begin to identify the cause of these symptoms.

    The second point he made in the article is
    Having an increase of symptoms is, one, very common in TMS recovery and is, two, a sign that you are on the right path. View it as a last ditch effort of your unconscious to have you focus on your symptoms instead of your emotions. Don't let it win. Do the work and focus on those emotions. It may be hard, but in the end your symptoms will go away.
     
    Enrique and JanAtheCPA like this.
  4. JanAtheCPA

    JanAtheCPA Beloved Grand Eagle

    I love both of these replies from Beach Girl and Forest.

    The first time I had a setback was the result of something a friend said, which I knew at the time bothered me. BUT I didn't stop to examine how I felt about her after what she said. When I became symptomatic the next day, I had to stop, listen to my body, and then sit down and briefly write about what she said, what bothered me, and how I felt about it, but most importantly, how I felt about her. Getting that up into my consciousness was the key, and I was noticeably better the next day.

    Celebrate (and give yourself credit for) the good days, don't worry about the bad days, don't look at the calendar, and keep plugging away. It will be worth it!

    Jan
     
    Rinkey likes this.
  5. veronica73

    veronica73 Well known member

    Thanks everyone. Forest, I remember reading that bit about the extinction burst but thanks for reminding me on that. I think that is what is going on.

    I also contacted my TMS doctor and he left me a voice mail saying the same thing...that this is very common and that I seemed to have a really good handle on the program and am doing well. That was a good reminder too.

    Thanks for listening :)
     
    Rinkey and Beach-Girl like this.

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