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Alex B. Overcoming shame

Discussion in 'Ask a TMS Therapist' started by Guest, Jun 24, 2014.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    Question
    I have something that happend in my past that I keep beating myself up for. I tend to feel a lot of shame for doing this and have trouble forgiving myself. Should I keep digging and journaling about this subject? Is there any techniques to forgiving myself for this and getting this out of my system?

    Do you have to find the one thing in your life or repression to get over the hump?
     
  2. Alex Bloom LCSW

    Alex Bloom LCSW TMS Therapist

    Answer
    Thanks for posting. This is a really common problem faced by TMS sufferers. Almost all of my clients have a tendency to focus on events from their past that bring up feelings of shame and self-abuse. So first of all, it's important not to get too down on yourself for falling into this habit: you are not alone.

    In treating TMS we often talk about the "inner bully", the part of your sub-conscious that continually punishes you, judges you and makes you feel small. In your case, this part of yourself is looking at what has happened in the past and using it as ammunition against you; a way to keep you feeling powerless, fearful and weak. This tendency to come down on yourself is on the other end of the self-treatment spectrum from the loving stance we want to encourage you to take towards yourself. When you think of these past events that have caused you problems, the ideal response would be to give yourself compassion, to recognize that there is hurt and grief and that you are need of support and care. However, in this case it seems that you are giving yourself the exact opposite! You are using this past event as a weapon to continue to punish yourself, long after the actual incident has occurred.

    It is crucial to recognize that no one deserves this kind of brutal treatment. It is time to stand up to the bully that continues to dominate you and tell it that you are sick and tired of it making you feel unworthy of care and love. And finally, of course, it is time for you to give yourself that self-care that you seem to long for.

    Often it is not one single incident, but a lifetime pattern of self-abuse that contributes to the symptoms of TMS. But your response and approach with regards to this one past event can serve to demonstrate how you treat yourself overall. See if you can spot the abuse for what it is and remember to give yourself the compassion you deserve.


    Any advice or information provided here does not and is not intended to be and should not be taken to constitute specific professional or psychological advice given to any group or individual. This general advice is provided with the guidance that any person who believes that they may be suffering from any medical, psychological, or mindbody condition should seek professional advice from a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions. No general advice provided here should be taken to replace or in any way contradict advice provided by a qualified, registered/licensed physician and/or psychotherapist who has the opportunity to meet with the patient, take a history, possibly examine the patient, review medical and/or mental health records, and provide specific advice and/or treatment based on their experience diagnosing and treating that condition or range of conditions.

    The general advice and information provided in this format is for informational purposes only and cannot serve as a way to screen for, identify, or diagnose depression, anxiety, or other psychological conditions. If you feel you may be suffering from any of these conditions please contact a licensed mental health practitioner for an in-person consultation.

    Questions may be edited for brevity and/or readability.

     
  3. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Guest, by coincidence, the advice from Alex about giving yourself compassion is the subject of a book
    I am now reading by Christopher Germer, a clinical psychologist in private practice. His book is
    titled The Mindful Path to Self-Compassion. I want to spend a few days reading the Kindle edition of the book and then will
    report on it in one of the wiki subforums. I'll let you know when and where I post it.

    My own thoughts on your problem is that you probably know what that big shame is that keeps
    haunting you and makes you feel bad about yourself. I think you just need to let go of it now and
    forgive yourself. Once we ask God to forgive us from a misdeed, He forgives, and we don't have to
    keep asking him for forgiveness. It's the same with our own selves. We recognize the cause of the shame
    and ask ourselves to let up on us, and we give ourselves self-compassion.

    Here is a web site on self-compassion with some videos that I think will be of interest to you.

    http://www.self-compassion.org/
     
    Ryan, Colly and tarala like this.
  4. tarala

    tarala Well known member

    Thanks for the link Walt, this is a really good site.
     
  5. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Germere has a lot of good stuff in his book and I will be posting about some of it later today
    and in the days ahead. Some great techniques for self-compassion and meditation.
     

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