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Hypnosis and Tms healing for Pain Pt 1

Discussion in 'General Discussion Subforum' started by Eric "Herbie" Watson, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. Eric "Herbie" Watson

    Eric "Herbie" Watson Beloved Grand Eagle

    See how many correlations you can find with hypnosis and Tms healing?


    A major component of hypnotic analgesia is perceptual

    alteration. The specific alteration technique used should be adjusted

    on the basis of the degree of hypnotic ability of the subject. Less hypnotizable

    individuals often respond better to distraction techniques

    that help them focus on competing sensations in another part

    of the body. However, most patients can be taught to develop a comfortable

    floating sensation in the affected body part. Some patients


    can be taught to imagine that the affected body part is numb. This

    technique is especially useful for extremely hypnotizable individuals

    who can, for example, imagine a shot of Novocain in the affected

    area and relive an experience of dental anesthesia, which they can

    then transfer to the painful part of their body. They can also simply

    “switch off” perception of the pain with surprising effectiveness

    (Hargadon et al. 1995; Miller et al. 1993). Some highly hypnotizable

    patients prefer to imagine that the pain is a substance with dimensions

    that can be moved to another part of the body or can flow

    out of the body as if it were a viscous liquid. Other highly hypnotizable

    patients may prefer to dissociate the affected part from the rest

    of the body. As an extreme form of hypnotically induced controlled

    dissociation, some patients may imagine themselves floating above

    their own body or stepping outside of their body and going elsewhere,

    creating distance between themselves and the painful sensation

    or experience.

    Temperature metaphors are often useful, which is not surprising

    given the fact that pain and temperature sensations are part of the

    same sensory system, the lateral spinothalamic tract. Such metaphors

    may be especially effective with more moderately hypnotizable patients.

    They may be taught to imagine that an affected body part is

    cooler using an image of dipping it in ice water, a bucket of ice chips,

    or an ice-cold mountain stream, or they may be taught to imagine

    heating the affected part with the sun, in a warm bath, or by applying

    a heating pad. Imagining these temperature sensations can often

    help patients transform their perception of pain signals.

    The choice of images or metaphors used for pain control involves

    certain general principles. The first is that the hypnotically controlled

    image should serve to filter the hurt out of the pain. The image

    should also help transform the pain experience. The patient is taught

    to acknowledge that the pain exists, but that there is a distinction between

    the signal itself and the discomfort that the signal causes. The

    hypnotic experience, which patients create and control, helps them

    transform the signal into one that is less uncomfortable. Patients

    learn to expand their perceptual options. Initially, they experience

    the pain as either there or not there. They can learn to see a third option,

    in which the pain is there but is transformed by the presence of

    such competing sensations as tingling, numbness, warmth, or coolness.

    Finally, patients are taught not to fight the pain. Fighting pain

    only enhances it by focusing attention on the pain; augmenting related

    frustration, anxiety, and depression; and increasing physical tension.

    Trance and Treatment
    Clinical Uses of Hypnosis

    Second Edition


    Herbert Spiegel, M.D.

    David Spiegel, M.D.
     
  2. Walt Oleksy

    Walt Oleksy Beloved Grand Eagle

    Herbie, this is a great post.
    Some TMSWiki people are saying they're interested in hypnosis
    as a supplement to TMS. I think they will respond to this after
    they've had a hypnosis session or a few of them.
     

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